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[Tropical Valley expedition]

Date produced: 1931

Filmmaker(s):

Mary Gibson Henry

Stan Clark

Description:

"Shows an expedition through northeastern British Columbia by Mary Gibson Henry, Pennsylvania botanist and plantswoman. Mrs. Henry was interested in the legendary "Tropical Valley" of northern B.C., where the warmth of hot springs supposedly fostered vegetation not otherwise found in the region. The film was shot in the summer of 1931, during the first of four such journeys she made in the period 1931-1935. Mrs. Henry was accompanied by her husband, Dr. J. Norman Henry; four of her children; topographer Knox McCusker (of the Dominion Topographical Surveys Branch); Dr. B.H. Chandler, a surgeon friend; and outfitter S. Clark, as well as various wranglers. The second and third reels of this three-reel film show the party of 16 travelling by pack-train, crossing rivers, caching food, and fishing, as well as some camp scenes. At an encampment of "Grand Lake Indians" on the Tetsa River, they engage Charlie Macdonald, the chief's son, to guide them to Toad Hot Springs on the Toad River, but they do not proceed north to Liard Hot Springs. On the return trip south, stops include St. Paul's Lake, Henry River, and Lake Mary and Lake Josephine [named after the Henry's daughters]; these place names do not seem to have become official. Following the Peace River, they arrive at Hudson's Hope (having travelled 800 miles in 79 days), and continue down river to Taylor Flats." (BC Archives)

The title given above is a supplied title based on the film contents. The actual title of the film is unknown, since it survives as reels 2 and 3 of 3 -- and the actual title and credits (if any) would likely have been at the start of reel 1.


Albany’s Tulip Festival

Date produced: 1950

Filmmaker(s):

Helen C. Welsh

Description:

"With the help of almost unbelievable luck from the weather man, Helen C. Welsh has achieved a high level of what is essentially newsreel filming. Her subject matter is in itself appealing — displays of tulips in a public park, children wearing amazing holiday headgear, dancers performing Old World figures, all climaxed by the pageantry of the coronation of a new king and queen of the festival. But Miss Welsh handles it expertly. Her viewpoints are varied and her camera work accomplished, while a wisely sparse and well recorded narrative ties the whole presentation into an attractive package. Albany's Tulip Festival is colorful, entertaining and fulsome as a record of a city's spring holiday." Movie Makers, Dec. 1950, 464.


All Nature Sings

Date produced: 1960

Filmmaker(s):

Glenn Wenger

Description:

"Wildflowers and desert life of some of the birds and small animals have called many but few have captured the beauty with such ease and grace. There is an intimacy with all the creatures as we watch them feed and play and the birds nest in the cactus, feeding and training the young. Those who live with and appreciate the desert will be delighted with this gem of a nature film" PSA Journal, Nov. 1960, 39.


Arizona Utopia

Date produced: 1960

Filmmaker(s):

Robert Davis

Theresa Davis

Description:

"A two-part lecture travelogue film on the state of Arizona. The film would have been originally presented with live narration by the filmmaker, Robert Davis. Part one includes footage of desert landscapes, ranches, pre-historic artifacts, Native American art production & industry (wigs, textiles, etc), saloons, regional industry (logging, agricultural, and dams). Part two also includes footage of desert landscapes, cacti and dams as well as scenes from Phoenix and the surrounding area. Highlights from part two include a tour of a trailer park and footage of people skiing and sledding down a snowy hill." Chicago Film Archives.


Awakening

Date produced: 1942

Filmmaker(s):

Herman Bartel

Description:

"Most movie makers look about for suitable music for a picture, only after it has been completed. Herman Bartel, who produced Awakening, scores his films just the other way around. He listens to a composition that he likes until he thinks of picture material that will express its mood. Since Mr. Barters appreciation and selection of music are above reproach and since his ability to take a camera and a roll of film and make them sing is well known, we can only add that this is his finest film to date. It is very difficult to explain a Bartel picture. You can say that the subjects are flowers, trees, animals and the other common manifestations of nature, but what you must see to believe is that they have never been filmed in quite his way before. Mr. Bartel does not use parts of records and change from one to another with abrupt shifts in themes. Instead, he uses each record in full. In this film, the blend of picture and music is so matched that, in some scenes, reeds and bushes sway to the rhythm of the music. Needless to say, the camera work in this picture is superb. Other color films may be exposed as well, but they will never be exposed better because here is more than perfect exposure and lighting. Mr. Bartel has taken what existed and has made it say what he wanted it to say through skillful control of the devices at hand." Movie Makers, Dec. 1942, 489, 506.


Bamboo of Japan

Date produced: 1969

Filmmaker(s):

Hutsutaro Kageyama

Description:

Bamboo of Japan is an 8mm film in color by Mr. Hutsutaro Kageyama of Kyoto, Japan. Bamboo to most of us means simply a fishing pole and not much more. Not so much in Japan. Bamboo is so much in demand there that bamboo tree plantations are quite prevalent. You will learn things about the use of bamboo that you never dreamed about of in the 22 minutes of this film. A very educational film and a credit to the country of its origin, Japan," PSA Journal, Mar. 1970, 43.


Bulbs and Beauty

Date produced: 1952

Filmmaker(s):

Haven Trecker

Description:

"Bulbs and Beauty reveals in painstaking detail the planting, cultivating and harvesting of gladioli in the vast fields surrounding the town of Momence in the state of Illinois. In this elaborate undertaking, Haven Trecker unfolds in well planned and profusely close-upped sequences the many colorful aspects of this popular plant in the life of flower-loving America. The harvesting sequence is followed by somewhat generous footage of a flower festival, the big annual affair in glad-minded Momence; and the festival in turn is followed by a seemingly endless parade in tribute to these bounteous blossoms. Bulbs and Beauty, accompanied agreeably by magnetic sound on film, appears to have been made for informative and record purposes. It fulfills these functions in a lively and competent manner." Movie Makers, Dec. 1952, 337, 339.


Daisy Dally

Date produced: 1961

Filmmaker(s):

Louise Luther

Description:

"Miss Luther has brought forth a delightful yet simple episode involving a little girl, a little boy, and a bouquet of daisies in the hand of each. We watch them as they walk across the meadow, play in the streams, give attention to the small animals and their attention to each other. Grandmother is ready with the kind of reward little children expect" PSA Journal, Oct. 1961, 47.


Floral Capers

Date produced: 1960

Filmmaker(s):

John W. Ruddell

Description:

"We remember Jack's Prelude to Spring a few years ago in which he dealt with time lapse photography. In Floral Capers he introduces the equipment he uses in time lapse photography and how he does it in one easy lesson. We watch flowers go through the opening cycle, vines racing up a pole, grasses, plants, and flowers racing ahead in their growth, split frame emphasizes the stimulation of light on the growth of plants. We watch many interesting events in the life of plants, and some amusing ones" PSA Journal, Nov. 1960, 40.


Flower for Isabelle, A

Date produced: 1963

Filmmaker(s):

Jerrold A. Peil

Description:

"Isabelle's next door neighbors - three bachelors - are asked to carry on for her, when she is stricken and hospitalized, in entering her prize orchid in the Garden Show. Their well-meaning but bumbling attempt to help her win the prize results in hilarious antics and a heart-warming conclusion to this delightful comedy" PSA Journal, Oct. 1963, 41.


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