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Long May We Cherish

Date produced:

Filmmaker(s):

Tommy Walker

Description:

This film was produced at some time in the 1950s.


May Day Conflict

Date produced: 1948

Filmmaker(s):

Herbert F. Sturdy

Description:

"May Day Conflict is a well executed and skillfully edited family story film of the conflict created by the opening of the trout season and a flower festival both falling on May first. The central character is a good loser (the husband, of course!), as he accompanies his wife to the flower show after elaborate preparations for his fishing trip. Herbert F. Sturdy has deftly woven into the story pattern light, humorous incidents to provide amusing comedy relief from his fine floral closeup studies. Expert camera handling and smooth transitions lend a semi-professional finish to the picture." Movie Makers, Dec. 1948, 493-494.


Pattern of Living, The

Date produced: 1965

Filmmaker(s):

Ivan C. Lowe

Description:

"In Pattern of Living we are told how life on this earth probably began. Most likely it started after the upheaval of the sun 5,000 million years ago. Algae and animacules were perhaps the first forms of life, to be followed by the vegetable, and later the worm which was the forerunner of insects as we know them today. Clorophyll, the narrator explains, is responsible for combining water with sunlight to produce sugar that gives energy. Much of the film was shot through a microscope and some animation is used" PSA Journal, Sept. 1965, 51.


Peach Growing in South Carolina

Date produced: 1967

Filmmaker(s):

Walter Bergmann

Description:

"The life cycle of the peach -- from peach blossom to peach pie" (Holmes, 2018).


Prelude to Spring

Date produced: 1957

Filmmaker(s):

John W. Ruddell

Description:

"Spring comes for John W. Ruddell and nature unfolds its little power plants of color and our cameraman has captured these beauties for us. The seed catalog heralds the coming of spring. The housewife busies herself with the new, pretty pages of flower pictures and goes into a bit of slumber. Then followed the results of a tremendous effort in filming single frame, time lapse growth of seeds, plants, trees, and flowers. This is not just another effort to make time lapse photography. The picture is sprinkled with unusual and amusing photographs of plant life and flowers, leaves grasses, carefully timed to the music. The choice and use of music in this picture does a great deal to enhance its effectiveness. A beautiful and delightful prelude to spring." PSA Journal, Nov. 1957, 32.

Prelude to Spring stands as the Canadian Film Awards' de facto Film of the Year for 1957 after the judges did not select a winner in the professional category.


Romance of the Hybrid Orchid

Date produced: 1943

Filmmaker(s):

A. M. Zinner

Description:

"A. M. Zinner has performed not only a labor of love in Romance of the Hybrid Orchid, but he has made an important contribution to the available information about orchid growing. Given the run of Shaw's Garden, the famous botanical park of St. Louis, he has traced the life of hybrid orchids from seed to full flowering, with especial study of the behind the scenes events in the hot beds and potting rooms. Outstanding is the section of the film devoted to the care and exact technique that must be used in handling seeds while they germinate. With this work of several years, Mr. Zinner takes his place in the ranks of significant amateur naturalists who have provided exhaustive records of some special field. In offering his carefully planned and detailed footage, Mr. Zinner also gives some very lovely flower pictures, including the rarest of the world's orchids. Beautiful camera work and expert sequencing mark the picture." Movie Makers, Dec. 1943, 474.


Rose and The Weed, The

Date produced: 1960

Filmmaker(s):

Stuart Dabbs

Description:

"The rose, a young girl, so proper, and so elegant in her royal dress, jewelry and jeweled crown. The weed, also a lovely girl, simply dressed and scorned by the rose. By scissors the rose is cut and its petals picked away to the delight of the weed, but then a gloved hand pulls the weed and leaves it to die in the sun. Can it be that some do not like weeds?" PSA Journal, Nov. 1960, 42.


Rushes

Date produced: 1930

Filmmaker(s):

J. V. D. Bucher

Description:

"The first on the list, Rushes, 300 ft., 16mm., filmed by J. V. D. Bucher, is an unusual effort, for it presents a continuity theme woven about a single subject, the wild rice plants in a marsh. It well illustrates what distinctive subjects for amateur movie making are offered by scenes close at hand that are often ignored. It is a satisfyingly beautiful study of the rushes, telling the story of their resistance to the assaults of nature, climaxed with their defeat by fire. The plan offered a large number of exposure problems which were successfully handled. Of particular beauty are the scenes of the burning rushes, taken with a fast lens, and fog effects and closeups of the plants' plume like heads, taken with filters against cloudy skies. The continuity motif used is simple and yet unites the subject into a complete entity rather than a series of disjointed sequences which happened to be taken of the same subject." Movie Makers, Dec. 1930, 758.


Sahuaro Land

Date produced: 1940

Filmmaker(s):

Frank E. Gunnell

Description:

"Sahuaro Land, by Frank E. Gunnell, is as clever and painless a teaching film as one may find in many a classroom screening. Here, in a colorful Arizona cactus desert, we find the surefire ingredients of a boy and his dog. The boy is an enthusiastic nature student who, in the course of his explorations of the region, contrives to make sundry entries in his notebook, which find their way to the screen. These data are all so natural a part of the story, however, that the information conveyed does not assume the rather forbidding status of an instructional title in any case. The outdoor color work is excellent, and the viewpoints are well chosen. Mr. Gunnell's use of telephoto technique for making closeup studies of distant, inaccessible objects (such as the bloom atop a tall cactus) was particularly effective. We learned a lot from this film." Movie Makers, Dec. 1940, 604.


Spatsizi Wilderness

Date produced:

Filmmaker(s):

Tommy Walker

Description:

"The unique wilderness of the Spatsizi Plateau, and the area's flora, fauna and scenery, as observed by guide-outfitter Tommy Walker. The film points out the negative impact of recent development in the area, and emphasizes the importance of preserving the Spatsizi. Mountain sheep, Stone sheep, Osborn caribou, moose, eagles, beaver, marmots, and many other wildlife species are shown" British Columbia Archives.
This film was produced at some time between 1956 and 1970.


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