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Water - Wild Animal of the Mountains

Date produced: 1950

Filmmaker(s):

Fred Hudson

Donal Michalsky

Description:

"Fred Hudson and Donal Michalsky of Los Angeles combined their talents to produce on black-and-white film the origin of a mountain storm and its eventual metamorphosis as a turbulent stream of water. The storm is depicted in gathering clouds moving swiftly among mountain peaks, thanks to ultra-speed photography. Highly artistic shots of the first raindrops falling on a pool indicate the break of the storm, and the camera then records in excellent rainfall shots the progression of the storm, forming of rivulets and their eventual building up to a mountain stream. The various moods are enhanced by the theme music on the sound track, excellently recorded." American Cinematographer, May 1951, 192.


Western Holiday

Date produced: 1937

Filmmaker(s):

Hamilton H. Jones

Description:

"Western Holiday offered one of those thrills in the sequence of sunrise on Mount Robson. Here Kodachrome caught, with what seemed magic, the first rosy glow on the cold, blue snow, which the continuity of photographic motion permitted to increase, to blossom and, finally, to blaze into a chromatic crown of jewels. To see this on the screen is to enjoy a rare experience. Hamilton H. Jones, in the highly intelligent cutting of his train sequences, gave the student of continuity another of these thrills. Those who are charmed by double turntable accompaniment will recognize the perfection with which an almost impossibly difficult feat of lip synchronization with record scoring has been handled. These are some of the higher spots in a film of unusually high general average. Mr. Jones is a Kodachrome movie maker of proved ability, who has made editing a special art. The film chosen for the first Hiram Percy Maxim Memorial Award will be used by Mr. Jones in his work as a lecturer on the vacation advantages of the Dominion of Canada, although it was made as his own enterprise, entirely at his own expense and not for compensation from a client. It is a part of his professional equipment. Briefly reviewed, Western Holiday carries the audience, via Canadian National Railways, from Victoria, Canada's most westerly metropolis, across the Rocky Mountains back to the Eastern Seaboard. Beginning with city views in Victoria and Vancouver, with strikingly colorful parades of the famous Canadian Mounted Police, we visit tourist centers and make trail trips from them. The camera goes into the interior of a glacier, it finds mountain goats and sheep, it clambers over the Continental Divide on horseback. All through the trip, it studies the progress of trains, weaving in and out of tunnels and over bridges. In his personal presentations of this film, Mr. Jones manipulates effects, such as whistles, bells, train noises and other oddments, with something approaching wizardry. In the face of competition of the highest order, Western Holiday is its own justification of preferment." Movie Makers, Dec. 1937, 602.


Wilderness Alps of Stehekin, The

Date produced: 1960

Filmmaker(s):

David Brower

Description:

"A story of the natural wilderness, people, and mountains 200 miles from the sea, the wilderness alps of Stehekin in the North Cascade country. Brought into its scenic grandeur through the ages never the same, yet not to be changed by man. There are the wild gardens and glaciers high above the sea but far below the icecaps on Mt. Rainier, from time preceding us. A beautiful, relaxing retreat with a narration to be remembered for its refreshing call to the wilderness" PSA Journal, Nov. 1960, 42.


Winged Hickory

Date produced: 1957

Filmmaker(s):

Theodore H. Sarchin

Description:

"Winged Hickory on the high snow-covered slopes in the area of Aspen, Colorado (not far from Denver) is a nostalgic piece of winter ski sports by Theodore H. Sarchin. Aspen is a famous old, deserted silver mining town that has been rejuvenated by ski enthusiasts taking advantage of the excellent slopes and weather conditions. The ski lift is the longest in the world. It requires 40 minutes to ride its full length, in two sections, to an elevation of 11,300 feet. There are beginner and novice trails and challenging slopes for the experienced skier. There are vistas of the towering snow-covered mountains as well as activities in camp. During one of the Gala Days, Mr. Sarchin photographed some unusually expert skiers, such as one on tall stilts, and four men on two long skis, sort of like four men on a horse. The beauty and grace of the skiers, speeding along with the snow feathering out behind, make the rugged beauty of the terrain an outstanding picture. The background music is well chosen and Mr. Sarchin's narration is adequate" PSA Journal, Nov. 1957, 53.


Winter in the White Mountains

Date produced: 1934

Filmmaker(s):

J. Ellis Fisher, Jr.

Eaton Cromwell


Wonderland Trails

Date produced: 1933

Filmmaker(s):

K. G. Stephens

Description:

"Wonderland Trails is a triumph of treatment over the subject matter. K. G. Stephens, ACL, has used with sensitive artistry the space and time saving devices of closeup synecdoche, lap dissolve and the fade in, telling his charming tale of a mountain hike that went astray. On this simple framework he has presented a series of lovely scenic views, always well photographed and often superior in their crisp beauty. Smart editing serves throughout to reinforce the values of this film, which is distinguished by an imaginative and careful advance planning." Movie Makers, Dec. 1933, 523.


Yellowstone and Glacier Park by Bicycle

Date produced: 1960

Filmmaker(s):

Stanley Midgley

Description:

"Stan Midgley returns again, this time presenting the "Yellowstone Tetons and Glacier Park." In the wonderful northwest corner of Wyoming you can see spectacular mountains, beautiful lakes, canyons, waterfalls, wild animals and more natural wonders than a tourist can see in a month. There are superb pictures of most of the world's greatest geysers and the changes made by the great 1959 earthquake with before and after pictures. There is Earthquake Lake and its notorious landslide. The Cooke City Red Lodge Highway over the Beartooth Mountains —Ghost Towns and modern towns of Western Montana —Glacier Park, beautiful from the highway, incomparable from the wilderness trail. The ending comes in the golden glory of autumn." Central Union Reaper, Sept. 27, 1966, 3.


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