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Mountaineers Club Teton Expedition, The

Date produced: 1936

Filmmaker(s):

Ray L. Garner

Description:

"The Mountaineers Club Teton Expedition, made by Ray Garner, tells the story of several young men who did some real mountain climbing among the peaks of famous Western mountains. A most interesting introduction, showing briefly the various types of climbing, prepared the audience for some of the amazing sequences later on. Remarkable attention to human interest details sustains the entertainment quality throughout and, when the actual climbing starts, the thrills are second to none. The agility of the cameraman contributed greatly to the effectiveness of the film." Movie Makers, Dec, 1936, 550.


Two Weeks

Date produced: 1936

Filmmaker(s):

W. W. Champion

Description:

"In Two Weeks, W. W. Champion has contrived that rare and refreshing thing — a personal record picture implicit with general human interest. Telling the story of a fortnight's pack trip with friends through Yosemite, the film gets off to a flying start with a delightfully detailed sequence of camp preparations. With complete naturalness, we are made acquainted with each of the vacation party. When, in good time, they set off down the trail, we feel quite sure that these people will prove of more interest than the locales that they will visit. Mr. Champion does not disappoint us, as he continues with an adroitly spun pattern of personalities and places. Crisp, steady and effectively angled, the photography of the film, in both monochrome and color, is of able assistance to the imaginative treatment." Movie Makers, Dec. 1936, 542.


Wonderland Trails

Date produced: 1933

Filmmaker(s):

K. G. Stephens

Description:

"Wonderland Trails is a triumph of treatment over the subject matter. K. G. Stephens, ACL, has used with sensitive artistry the space and time saving devices of closeup synecdoche, lap dissolve and the fade in, telling his charming tale of a mountain hike that went astray. On this simple framework he has presented a series of lovely scenic views, always well photographed and often superior in their crisp beauty. Smart editing serves throughout to reinforce the values of this film, which is distinguished by an imaginative and careful advance planning." Movie Makers, Dec. 1933, 523.


Telemark

Date produced: 1933

Filmmaker(s):

William G. McKelvy

Description:

"Telemark, filmed in the Swiss Alps by William G. McKelvy, ACL, is, as its name suggests, a skiing picture. However, it is more than that — it is also a very delightful and neatly plotted comedy that is the more convincing for being uncomplicated with the usual subsidiary plot and counter plot. Four or five youths who are expert skiers, one who is a novice, and a girl are at the beginning of a down mountain ski trail. The girl offers a kiss to the boy who can catch her. She tarts off, the able skiers follow hard on her trail, while the beginner stumbles and lags far behind. But the girl decides to trick her pursuers and hides on the way. The ending is obvious. The picture was exquisitely planned and sequenced for, as the camera follows the skiers down the mountain, there is complete smoothness in the shift of viewpoints. The action is made the occasion of splendid studies, as the boys on the run swerve and turn in stems, Christianias and Telemarks. Mr. McKelvy did not neglect to select charming compositions and to take full advantage of clear air and the contrast between the dark figures and trees and the white snow." Movie Makers, Dec. 1933, 500.


Grand Teton Country, The

Date produced: 1932

Filmmaker(s):

H. W. Voss

Description:

"Among the films awarded honorable mention is The Grand Teton Country, carrying with it a breadth and sweep of all outdoors, a Kodacolor film by H. W. Voss, ACL. This picture is, first of all, an eloquent and colorful reply to those who do not believe that long shots can be taken successfully by this process. Time and again, in viewing this film, one is astonished by the clarity and detail of distant mountains, rearing their majestic, snow capped heads up into the cold blue of the sky, while the foreground is shown in all of its true colors. Mr. Voss has proved to skeptical Easterners that Rainbow Falls really lives up to its name. His Kodacolor camera, skillfully handled so as to produce a dark background for the rainbow formed by the sun shining on the spray, reveals perfectly that faint, tenuous beauty which is all the more remembered because evanescent. But solid, palpable colors are pictured here, too. Mountains and canyons, lakes that are mirrors, desert flowers and all the glowing colors that are part of the West, are arranged on Mr. Voss's film palette. Especially well considered was his continued use of the various neutral density filters in order to give distant shots their correct value in the brilliant sun and the inclusion of interesting action in each scene." Movie Makers, Dec. 1932, 560-561.


Total Pages: 7