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Skis Over Skoki

Date produced: 1939

Filmmaker(s):

John C. Jay, Jr.

Description:

"Filmed by John C. Jay, Jr., ACL, of Williams College, Skis Over Skoki was shown recently at the Eleventh Annual Show of Amateur Motion Pictures, sponsored by Duncan MacD. Little, ACL. Mr. Jay's film, which is 400 feet of 16mm. Kodachrome, accompanied by sound on disc, was made for the Canadian Pacific Railway and will be shown by them to major ski clubs throughout the country. The film outlines a short story of a girl who, having grown bored with the usual mountain trails, leaves her guide during one of the downhill runs and starts over treacherous territory alone. How she ends her journey and what happens en route are shown by Mr. Jay in some of his finest pictures of skiing, a field in which he is an expert. He has made several films of skiing in the past" Movie Makers, June, 1940, 279.


Sky-Land Trails of the Kings

Date produced: 1940

Filmmaker(s):

David Brower

Richard Leonard

Description:

Subtitled: a story of happy days in Kings Canyon National Park.


Snow on the Mountains

Date produced: 1944

Filmmaker(s):

Robert P. Kehoe

Description:

"Robert P. Kehoe accepted a strong challenge and secured a fine result in filming Snow on the Mountains. Filming so static a subject as snow forms, iced trees and wind storms on a mountain presents a real task of vitalizing the material. Mr. Kehoe has brought weird and beautiful life to the screen. This film, excellently scored to present the musical message suggested by the snow scenes, builds from the pleasantness of subdued ice and snow forms, through the almost animate figures created by winter on trees and bushes, to a breath taking climax of a snow storm on the mountain. Culminating the beautifully edited and intelligently filmed footage is an inspiring sequence of flaming powdered snow, reflecting the full crimson of the sunset. So remarkable is this action that the impression imparted is almost one of a cascade of liquid fire flowing across the screen. In order to secure many of the scenes, Mr. Kehoe stood so long in the snow that it was necessary actually to lift him into a motor car and to remove the cine equipment from his chilled hands at the end of his task." Movie Makers, Dec. 1944, 494.


Solduc To The Blue

Date produced: 1948

Filmmaker(s):

Theodore H. Sarchin

Description:

"The Blue refers to a glacier of majestic proportions high in the Olympic Mountains of northern Washington. Solduc, a small station in the Hoh Valley, is the point from which Theodore H. Sarchin and his two companions set out with high hopes to conquer the formidable ascent to the famous ice fields. Although they reach the Blue, the sun has been there first, softening the ice, and they must turn back without having attained the summit. Inherent in the film is a deep reverence for the wild, inspiring beauty of the scene, which clearly communicates itself to the audience — no small achievement in an amateur travel study. This reverence never becomes mawkish, the pedestrian titles and homely incidents en route nicely counterbalancing it. Superior camera work makes the most of the setting, while skillful editing combined the best elements of story and scene to make a dramatic presentation. An expertly scored musical accompaniment adds impressively to enjoyment of Solduc To The Blue." Movie Makers, Dec. 1948, 492.


Telemark

Date produced: 1933

Filmmaker(s):

William G. McKelvy

Description:

"Telemark, filmed in the Swiss Alps by William G. McKelvy, ACL, is, as its name suggests, a skiing picture. However, it is more than that — it is also a very delightful and neatly plotted comedy that is the more convincing for being uncomplicated with the usual subsidiary plot and counter plot. Four or five youths who are expert skiers, one who is a novice, and a girl are at the beginning of a down mountain ski trail. The girl offers a kiss to the boy who can catch her. She tarts off, the able skiers follow hard on her trail, while the beginner stumbles and lags far behind. But the girl decides to trick her pursuers and hides on the way. The ending is obvious. The picture was exquisitely planned and sequenced for, as the camera follows the skiers down the mountain, there is complete smoothness in the shift of viewpoints. The action is made the occasion of splendid studies, as the boys on the run swerve and turn in stems, Christianias and Telemarks. Mr. McKelvy did not neglect to select charming compositions and to take full advantage of clear air and the contrast between the dark figures and trees and the white snow." Movie Makers, Dec. 1933, 500.


This Side of Paradise

Date produced: 1936

Filmmaker(s):

A. Scott Moorhouse

Description:

"The prizewinner for color, 'This Side of Paradise,' was in Kodachrome and entered by A. Scott Moorhouse of Toronto, a member of the Toronto Amateur Movie Club. The locale of the subject was the Italian and Swiss mountains and lakes. The decision on color or rather the reaching of it constituted one of the committee's chief headaches. There were some remarkable examples submitted. Mr. Moorhouse has a right to feel proud of his product." American Cinematographer, Jan. 1938, 27.


Transition

Date produced: 1955

Filmmaker(s):

Othel G. Goff

Description:

"An intelligent, informative story of glaciers, rivers and meadows in the Canadian Rockies. Music and narration well above average. In a land frequented by many vacationing photographers who usually shoot conventional scenes from the main highway, the advantages gained from striking off on foot over the trails are pleasingly evident in this enjoyable film" PSA Journal, Dec. 1955, 35.


Two Dudes In Montana

Date produced: 1948

Filmmaker(s):

Lester F. Shaal

Description:

"Two Dudes In Montana, by Lester F. Shaal, is an engaging and altogether competent record of a dude ranch vacation. In it, two attractive Eastern youngsters are seen adapting themselves with enthusiasm to the strange and stimulating adventures of Western ranch life. Developing his theme deliberately and in carefully integrated continuity, Mr. Shaal shows his tenderfeet taking to the saddle for safaris which progress from an afternoon's outing to full scale pack trips into the high mountains. The producer brings to this subject matter a fine technical skill with movie tools which has long been his. New and rewarding in his present work is an evolving eye for the appeal of human interest." Movie Makers, Dec. 1948, 496.


Two Weeks

Date produced: 1936

Filmmaker(s):

W. W. Champion

Description:

"In Two Weeks, W. W. Champion has contrived that rare and refreshing thing — a personal record picture implicit with general human interest. Telling the story of a fortnight's pack trip with friends through Yosemite, the film gets off to a flying start with a delightfully detailed sequence of camp preparations. With complete naturalness, we are made acquainted with each of the vacation party. When, in good time, they set off down the trail, we feel quite sure that these people will prove of more interest than the locales that they will visit. Mr. Champion does not disappoint us, as he continues with an adroitly spun pattern of personalities and places. Crisp, steady and effectively angled, the photography of the film, in both monochrome and color, is of able assistance to the imaginative treatment." Movie Makers, Dec. 1936, 542.


Urbia-Aralar

Date produced: 1978

Filmmaker(s):

Benito Ansola Erkiaga

Description:

Excursión a los montes de Urbia y Aralar. El filme muestra un paisaje maravilloso por los senderos del parque natural de Aralar y una acampada en las praderas de hierba verde de Urbia, una ruta clásica entre montañeros que incluye el paso por localidades emblemáticas.

An excursion to the Urbia and Aralar mounts. The film depicts a wonderful landscape through the paths of the Aralar natural park, and a camping trip through the green prairies of Urbia, a classic route for mountaineers that includes passing through emblematic places.


Total Pages: 7