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Navajo Rug Weaving

Date produced: 1941

Filmmaker(s):

E. Tad Nichols

Description:

"E. Tad Nichols, III, born in the West, has been in the saddle almost since he first toddled. Much of his time has been spent among the Western Indians, and he has an intimate knowledge of their ways. So skillfully has he planned and edited each sequence of Navajo Rug Weaving that the audience has the rare satisfaction which comes from seeing just the right amount of each step of this ancient art that has held one method and course for many centuries. The direction and filming are of such excellence that the viewer almost seems to be present for the carding, spinning, dyeing and actual weaving of the rugs. Here is the human record film at its best." Movie Makers, Dec. 1945, 495.


Navajo Seasons

Date produced:

Filmmaker(s):

Sallie Wagner

Description:

"Un-staged documentary footage shot and edited by Sallie Wagner. Sallie's description of the film: 'Wide Ruins and area, farming Navajos, Black Rock - Medicine Man, Cut Hair plowing, Joe Toddy following Cut Hair, planting, Patsy Martin standing on Cultivator, Jim House's wife husking corn, Paul Jones helping husk corn, sheep dipping at Ganado, Dwight Wagner viewing sheep dipping, wool shearing at Wide Ruins, loading sheep at Chambers, tall man in tan outfit Bill Cousins, Bent Knee sitting on fence, Crip Chee's grandson in closing scene'." New Mexico States Archives.


Navajo Weaving I

Date produced:

Filmmaker(s):

Sallie Wagner

Description:

"Part one of Navajo Weaving. Un-staged documentary footage shot and edited by Sallie Wagner. Sallie's description of the film: 'Crip Chee's Hogan, Milton Davis holding lamb, Eleanor Johnson from Hawaii, Bill Lippincott, Grandstaff (center), Hosteen Glish - purchase of rams for up-breeding, shearing at Wide Ruins, Jim House on horseback, Joe Toddy taking wool out for sorting and sacking for shipment, dipping in chute, Walter Ashley putting sheep in dip, Little Shorty to left, washing the wool before spinning, Patsy Martin sorting, Sybil Shorty carding wool, Dorothy Lippincott Stockton trying to learn, Louise Dale spinning wool, washing of yarn, gathering plants for dyes, Little Woman (Captive of Kit Carson - survived the Long March) grey-haired woman - stripping bark from Juniper root for red dye'." New Mexico States Archives.


Navajo Weaving II

Date produced:

Filmmaker(s):

Sallie Wagner

Description:

"Part two of Navajo Weaving. Un-staged documentary footage shot and edited by Sallie Wagner. Sallie's description of the film: 'Rose Martin, Patsy Martin warping, Sybil Shorty weaving, looms built by the Lippincotts at the Wide Ruins Indian School, Madge Clark, Dan Gaddy, and John Joe in front of the trading post, Bill Lippincott in patio with rug display, Bill Cousins selling rug to tourist'." New Mexico State Archives.


Navajoland

Date produced: 1949

Filmmaker(s):

Richard Thiriot

Description:

"'Navajoland' entered by Richard V. Thiriot, of Salt Lake City, is a travelogue on that part of the great Southwest where dwell the dwindling and not-to-well-off Navajos. Thiriot has caught the beauty of this colorful country with his camera and Kodachrome film, and concludes the picture with intimate shots of some of the Indians who inhabit Navajoland. Had Thiriot been able to schedule his filming during the stormy weather season and thus been able to capture the colorful skies abounding in Navajoland at that time of the year, his photography would have greater pictorial interest, highly neccesary where subject material is predominantly static. Thiriot used a Filmo 70-DA and Kodachrome film." American Cinematographer, Apr. 1950, 145.


New Zealand Holiday

Date produced: 1960

Filmmaker(s):

Floyd Henry Wells

Description:

"Edited film by Floyd Henry Wells, a retired salesman and a member of the Wally Byam Caravan Club of Airstream trailers, chronicling travel through New Zealand including scenic views, urban scenes, beaches, Puhoi Hotel, Lyltelton and Diamond Harbors, marina, fishing, Wairakei Geyser Valley, geysers, Tehokowhitu-atu archway, Maori Reserve and indigenous peoples, and motor camping (Rainbow Springs Motor Camp)," Human Studies Film Archives, Smithsonian Museum.


Ngono and Her People

Date produced: 1938

Filmmaker(s):

Ray L. Garner

Description:

"About a 9-year-old African girl, found by Protestant missionaries in the French Cameroons and reared in a mission school, who later marries a native teacher and returns to help her village." National Archives.


Our Cariboo Neighbours

Date produced: 1941

Filmmaker(s):

Harriet Gerry

Description:

"Harriet Gerry shot this film during an automobile journey from Rosedale to Williams Lake and Soda Creek on the Cariboo Highway, and part of the return trip via the Dog Creek Road, in the summer of 1941" British Columbia Archives.


Our Friendly Enemies

Date produced: 1950

Filmmaker(s):

Ralph E. Gray

Description:

"Our Friendly Enemies: This unique title has its origin in the fact that the Seminoles are the only native American Indians who have never signed a peace treaty with the government. Ralph E. Gray has chronicled in color with his 16mm Cine Special camera the contemporary life of the Seminoles living in Florida, picturing their activities against the backdrop of modern-day living and habits. Gray's reputation for camera and good editing has resulted in very professional results on the screen. Narration and sound effects on the recorded track round out the superior treatment of this better than average amateur effort." American Cinematographer, May 1951, 190.


Primitive Patzcuaro

Date produced: 1937

Filmmaker(s):

Ralph E. Gray

Description:

"One comes from a screening of Primitive Patzcuaro, by Ralph E. Gray, with an overwhelming impression of pure beauty. Here, in compositions which often echo the Old Masters in their warmth of color and satisfying balance, an amateur movie maker has turned his camera on the simple life about him and found it pleasing. One after another, the magnificent scenes and sequences bring from the spectator that involuntary expression of deep pleasure which is ambrosia even to the great of amateur movies. In Primitive Patzcuaro, Mr. Gray has portrayed, with leisure, the life of the Tarascan Indians, remote from civilization in a rarely visited section of Mexico. Although magnificent in its color studies, the film is abundant in human interest as well; in portions devoted to the bright native dances and religious ceremonies, it presents a series of tableaux that are breath taking in their effectiveness." Movie Makers, Dec. 1937, 626-627.


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