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Ducky ‘n Busty

Date produced: 1937

Filmmaker(s):

Emile Gallet

Description:

"To the producer of Ducky 'n Busty must be given the palm of accomplishment for making the first 16mm. cartoon story in Kodachrome that has come to the attention of the League. Plenty of publicity has been given to the immense amount of detailed work that goes into making a theatrical screen cartoon. In Hollywood, this is done by a large staff, but Emile Gallet, producer of this unusual film, performed every bit of the work himself. This included the construction of a special apparatus for shooting color film, frame by frame, the arrangement of proper lighting and designing an alignment device for bringing each separate drawing into correct relationship with its predecessor. In addition, Mr. Gallet, who is an artist, planned the scenario and executed each separate drawing in color. The monumental effort thus involved may be deduced from the fact that there are forty frames to each foot of film and that Ducky 'n Busty runs to a length of 400 feet. The subject matter of this amusing cartoon is of the type familiar in theatrical productions, wherein the antics of birds and animals repeat the foibles of humankind. In imaginative color design, fine technical work and sheer achievement in this field, into which so few amateur workers have ventured, Mr. Gallet rates highest praise." Movie Makers, Dec. 1937, 629.


Essence of Life

Date produced: 1955

Filmmaker(s):

G. Clifford Carl

Description:

"The dependence of all living things on water. The physical properties of water; water as a habitat for such creatures as insects, birds, beavers, frogs; use and abuse of water resources by man." (BC Archives)


Europe I

Date produced: 1928

Filmmaker(s):

Alexander Black

Description:

"Travelogue with intertitles of Alexander Black's trip to Europe in 1928. It includes footage of air and sea travel, a phantom ride in a gondola, and footage of Black himself feeding pigeons in Venice, Italy." UC Berkeley Library.


Fine Feathers

Date produced: 1935

Filmmaker(s):

T. R. Small

Description:

"A bird picture." American Cinematographer, Feb. 1937, 80.


Fowl is Fare

Date produced: 1967

Filmmaker(s):

Peter Weiner

Description:

"Fowl is Fare is a documentary showing how Long Island ducks are prepared for market. Unusual angles and tight editing keep the film moving" PSA Journal, Aug. 1967, 37.


Gannets, The

Date produced: 1950

Filmmaker(s):

Warren A. Levett

Description:

"In one sense, the outstanding strength of The Gannets, Maxim Award winner for 1950, is its seemingly worst weakness. That strength is the unquestioned — but apparently accidental — entertainment which the film provides. Running a brief 400 feet of 16mm. color, the picture examines the famous gannet colony on Gaspe's Bonaventure Island, treating the giant birds with lighthearted good humor and casual unpretension. The entire accomplishment seems too easy. You could do it, you feel, over a single sunny weekend. But don't let this fool you. To begin with, there is the technique. In The Gannets, Warren Levett has employed with a knowing skill every technical artifice learned in long years of bird filming. Telephoto lenses present his gleaming subjects in crisp and astounding closeups. The follow shots of birds in flight are suave and invariably centered, while slow motion reveals arrestingly their superb aero-dynamics. Side and back lighting enhance repeatedly the natural beauty of the birds, aided on occasion by a shrewd use of the polaroid filter. Secondly, there is the subject matter treatment. Pictorially, Mr. Levett knows his way around a sequence with unerring instinct. He knows, too, the strength which lies in a pair of shears; his editing of a subject so often overladen by the amateur is incisive and refreshing. And, perfectly interwoven with the pictorial presentation, is the third strength of The Gannets — the delight of the picture's narrative. You learn things about gannets as you listen — but they're not long-winded nor in Latin — and you're scarcely conscious of the learning. What you are conscious of is that the gannet is a strange, gabby, beautiful and, sometimes, supremely ludicrous creature. You are, in a word, entertained as you are informed — and you love every light-hearted minute of it. It is only later, if at all, that you realize the true measure of this superb movie." Movie Makers, Dec. 1950, 446-447.


Gaspesia

Date produced: 1949

Filmmaker(s):

Warren A. Levett

Description:

"Gannets are treated exhaustively and other aspects of life on Gaspe lightly in W. A. Levett's Gaspesia, a sound and often informative study of this tiny Canadian community. Mr. Levett has his Kodachrome under crisp control, and the strong textures in many of his sequences lend authenticity to a generally able film. The life of the gannets is admirably handled, though the time devoted to them tends to give the film a split personality." Movie Makers, Dec. 1949, 469.


Humming-birds

Date produced: 1931

Filmmaker(s):

Margaret Bodine


Hummingbird

Date produced: 1941

Filmmaker(s):

Richard Cassell

Description:

"In making Hummingbird, Dr. Richard Cassell has succeeded admirably in producing a film of absorbing interest and, at the same time, one of distinct educational value. In a straightforward and workmanlike manner, he presents the life story of a family of these minute winged creatures in close shots and extreme closeups. The film treatment is simple and direct, stressing the growth and habits of the birds. The patience that must go into the production of a film of this type never shows, but Dr. Cassel's movie making skill is apparent in every scene. While the technical excellences of exposure and composition are notable in this film, the most amazing achievement is its lighting. Obviously difficult even to film, many of the closeups appear almost to have studio lighting. The titling is clean cut and well integrated and the cutting is deftly paced, this quality being helped by the wide range of viewpoints and an excellent choice of camera positions." Movie Makers, Dec. 1941, 565-566.


Hummingbirds

Date produced: 1940

Filmmaker(s):

E. R. Hoff

Description:

"Shakespeare tells us that Owen Glendower said that he could summon spirits from the vasty deep; Archimedes boasted that, with the right kind of lever and fulcrum, he could move the Earth. But, did either of them ever tackle hummingbirds? E. R. Hoff, in Hummingbirds, not only tackled them but, apparently, he so charmed them that they flew where and when he wanted. As a result, whoever sees his film will know more about the ways of the almost invisible aerial dynamo than he has ever believed that anybody could know, short of being a hummingbird himself. This film is not only a revelation of incredible patience and determination, but it is cinematographically an accomplishment of genuine intelligence. Mr. Hoff has called our attention to the control of composition, sequence and background quality, evidently because he feared that they might be taken for granted. It is precisely because of these factors that Hummingbirds placed in the Ten Best. It is beyond the limits of this rating of Movie Makers to attempt to find an adequate laurel for the superb achievement of the naturalist which Mr. Hoff is. At any rate, the next time we see a flash of color on a summer afternoon, we can say, "What now, little bird? We know what makes you go round." " Movie Makers, Dec. 1940, 600.


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