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Eyewitness to Extinction: The Chinese River Dolphin

Date produced: 1985

Filmmaker(s):

Robbins Barstow

Description:

"In December 2006, scientific researchers announced that a species of dolphin which had existed for millions of years in the Yangtze River in China had become extinct. This documentary includes scenes of the last living, captive specimen of the Chinese River Dolphin, filmed in Wuhan, China, on a 1985 trip by Dr. Robbins Barstow, of Wethersfield, Connecticut, USA." Archive.org


Follow the Plow

Date produced: 1938

Filmmaker(s):

T. W. Willard

Description:

"Well known for its attainments in the commercial film field, the T. W. Willard Motion Picture Company sets a new high in its publicity productions with Follow the Plow. To technical excellence they have added sound sequencing; into a record of vocational education, they have instilled beauty and human interest. The subject matter concerns the training given to selected city boys in the fundamentals of farming at the Bowdoin Farm, operated by the Children's Aid Society of New York City. Tracing the course of these boys from the sidewalks and streets to the fields, at New Hamburg, N. Y., the location of the farm, the film expands with the glorious color of the autumn country and becomes a living essay of the pleasures of farm life. Constantly changing angles and intelligent titling lend pace to the production. Despite the limited interest in the specific subject of plows and cows, the appeal is made universal through magnificent color scenes and competent treatment." Movie Makers, Dec. 1938, 618.


Fowl is Fare

Date produced: 1967

Filmmaker(s):

Peter Weiner

Description:

"Fowl is Fare is a documentary showing how Long Island ducks are prepared for market. Unusual angles and tight editing keep the film moving" PSA Journal, Aug. 1967, 37.


Fox Hunting in Canada

Date produced: 1955

Filmmaker(s):

Walker Lynch


Gannets, The

Date produced: 1950

Filmmaker(s):

Warren A. Levett

Description:

"In one sense, the outstanding strength of The Gannets, Maxim Award winner for 1950, is its seemingly worst weakness. That strength is the unquestioned — but apparently accidental — entertainment which the film provides. Running a brief 400 feet of 16mm. color, the picture examines the famous gannet colony on Gaspe's Bonaventure Island, treating the giant birds with lighthearted good humor and casual unpretension. The entire accomplishment seems too easy. You could do it, you feel, over a single sunny weekend. But don't let this fool you. To begin with, there is the technique. In The Gannets, Warren Levett has employed with a knowing skill every technical artifice learned in long years of bird filming. Telephoto lenses present his gleaming subjects in crisp and astounding closeups. The follow shots of birds in flight are suave and invariably centered, while slow motion reveals arrestingly their superb aero-dynamics. Side and back lighting enhance repeatedly the natural beauty of the birds, aided on occasion by a shrewd use of the polaroid filter. Secondly, there is the subject matter treatment. Pictorially, Mr. Levett knows his way around a sequence with unerring instinct. He knows, too, the strength which lies in a pair of shears; his editing of a subject so often overladen by the amateur is incisive and refreshing. And, perfectly interwoven with the pictorial presentation, is the third strength of The Gannets — the delight of the picture's narrative. You learn things about gannets as you listen — but they're not long-winded nor in Latin — and you're scarcely conscious of the learning. What you are conscious of is that the gannet is a strange, gabby, beautiful and, sometimes, supremely ludicrous creature. You are, in a word, entertained as you are informed — and you love every light-hearted minute of it. It is only later, if at all, that you realize the true measure of this superb movie." Movie Makers, Dec. 1950, 446-447.


Gaspesia

Date produced: 1949

Filmmaker(s):

Warren A. Levett

Description:

"Gannets are treated exhaustively and other aspects of life on Gaspe lightly in W. A. Levett's Gaspesia, a sound and often informative study of this tiny Canadian community. Mr. Levett has his Kodachrome under crisp control, and the strong textures in many of his sequences lend authenticity to a generally able film. The life of the gannets is admirably handled, though the time devoted to them tends to give the film a split personality." Movie Makers, Dec. 1949, 469.


Goldilocks and the Three Bears

Date produced: 1951

Filmmaker(s):

Joseph Fischer

Description:

"Joseph Fischer's 'Goldilocks And The Three Bears' is an unusual amateur accomplishment in which the filmer and his associates staged the age old nursery tale in miniature, building all the sets, props and the marionette figures themselves. A drawback is the lack of sound narration or continuity titles." American Cinematographer, May 1952, 224.


Hawaiian Paradise [1966]

Date produced: 1966

Filmmaker(s):

Julian Gromer

Description:

"2 part edited travel footage taken in numerous Hawaiian locations. Focuses on events and people as well as the natural scenery. Includes traditional dancing, a festival and a visit to an aquarium as well as religious locations." Chicago Film Archives.


Heart of the Cassiar

Date produced:

Filmmaker(s):

Tommy Walker

Description:

This film was produced at some time in the 1950s.


Heart of the Land

Date produced: 1959

Filmmaker(s):

Russell Jameson

Description:

"A scientific expedition to Mexico for a study of the animals, reptiles and birds. Our visit for the most part is in the rural or wilderness areas but we do get into the market place and we see some of the ancient ruins. A pictorial review of a great many of species of wild life which we rarely see as many of us are afraid to visit the habitat of those creatures. The close-up photography puts the small creatures almost on our noses" PSA Journal, Nov. 1959, 48.


Total Pages: 12