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Is Zat You Myrtle?

Date produced: 1956

Filmmaker(s):

Paul Brundage

Description:

"Animated puppets, dogs in this case. Synchronized with a song of the same title and cleverly done." PSA Journal, Nov. 1956, 45.


It Happened to Humphrey

Date produced: 1960

Filmmaker(s):

Kieth Alan Pfohl

Description:

"Humphrey, a loveable dog built low to the ground and with big ears. He does for a playful run in the park. He flushes out a cup and this releases the genie who extends three wishes to Humphrey. Our "fido" wishes himself into the form of man. But in the actions that follow, he is still Humphrey. In the end genie returns Humphrey to h is conventional self and there is a captivating happiness in again being a dog" PSA Journal, Nov. 1960, 40.


Lassie Stays Home

Date produced: 1945

Filmmaker(s):

Raymond J. Berger

Description:

"Children and pets are generally lovable and always interesting; but filming them is not a simple task, as many amateurs have found out. Raymond J. Berger, in Lassie Stays Home, accomplishes it with a sure touch and an ease that will be the envy of his fellow filmers. The excellently planned story tells of a lost child who is found by Lassie, the loyal canine family member, after the baby's somewhat older sister hunts her frantically. No adult appears in any of the footage; and remarkably enough, one does not sense the directing mother, just out of camera range. The whole movie goes forward as if the children and Lassie were entirely alone, with the camera miles away. Here is 8mm at its best and here is a film that every amateur would be proud to have made." Movie Makers, Dec. 1945, 494.


Magnificent Accident, The

Date produced: 1946

Filmmaker(s):

Raymond J. Berger

Description:

"In a relatively short period of filming, Raymond J. Berger has mastered a type of photoplay which a great many persons have expressed a desire to make, the story film featuring a child and a pet. His script, a simple and unpretentious recounting of how an invalid child wills herself to walk again, to go to the aid of her injured dog, proves an ideal vehicle for Mr. Berger's young daughter and her handsome collie, Lassie. This 8mm. Kodachrome picture, scored with re-recorded music, is noteworthy for its excellent framing and splendid closeups. Particularly engaging is the sequence, after the accident, showing the mutual recovery of the two stars. Young Miss Berger, considering the limited histrionic ability of a natural child, plays her role with grace and assurance; her crying scenes and the ingenuous frolics with Lassie are unusually credible and well performed. Mr. Berger deserves credit for his planning and fulfillment of a screen play that revolves around two such charming personalities." Movie Makers, Dec. 1946, 486.


Mischief

Date produced: 1933

Filmmaker(s):

Van Dee Sickler

Description:

"Under the classification of Home Movie, Van Dee Sickler of Los Angeles was awarded the $50.00 prize for his picture 'Mishcief,' a 16 mm subject in 200 feet. The continuity is evolved around his wife, a Scotch terrier, a cat and a bird. The continuity, titles and photography of this picture were very good." American Cinematographer, Dec. 1934, 376.


Nite Life

Date produced: 1936

Filmmaker(s):

J. Kinney Moore

Description:

"A perfectly delightful holiday in personal filming, replete with humor, and imagination, is the comedy, Nite Life, produced by J. Kinney Moore, entirely in Kodachrome and, what is more, almost entirely in interior Kodachrome, by artificial light. Mr. Moore, in his work, refutes the contention, sometimes heard, that the amateur should be wary of film comedy. And, beside negotiating this pinnacle successfully, the producer has added an outstanding technical handling of Kodachrome, as well as a highly diverting and intelligent use of the various camera illusions it is possible to produce with the aid of modern 16mm. equipment. The obvious zest and pleasure with which the actor producer entered into the creation of this film add immeasurably to its value as a genuine document of personal filming achievement. Examples of carefully planned and executed trick photography follow one another in such rapid succession in the film that the spectator is left time only to gasp. However, these tricks are not executed simply for their own sake, but strictly in accordance with the furtherance of the plot. It must be said that, in the second part of the film, the author does yield slightly to the temptation of attenuating the action somewhat in order to spin out his bag of tricks. But the film as a whole is so delightful that any audience could easily forgive this small shortcoming." Movie Makers, Dec. 1936, 542.


Number Three Arrives

Date produced: 1937

Filmmaker(s):

John Martin

Description:

"With Number Three Arrives, John Martin carries on the continuity both of his charming family and of his delightful films of them, so ably introduced by his last year's award winner, A Day with the Young Martins. Here again are the sure feeling for cinematic story technique, the nicely effective angles and the smooth sequencing which belies any need for titles. Added to these deft and familiar abilities of Mr. Martin's work, the current production brings to light a delightful flair for farce comedy by the harassed father and a family terrier rivaling, on a small scale, the best of Hollywood's canine thespians. Once more, Mr. Martin has proved beyond argument that a well planned family film may be of interest to all who see it." Movie Makers, Dec. 1937, 630.


On the Farm

Date produced: 1940

Filmmaker(s):

Marjean Headapohl

Mary Elizabeth Headapohl

Description:

"Sunlight and morning noises, the rich, sweet smell of clover, the hot grain fields at midday and windmills drawing water from the deep earth — these are part of the common life of an Ohio farm that two young girls, Marjean and Mary Elizabeth Headapohl, have put into their film, On the Farm. It is a record as American in feeling as Walderts Pond, even though unconsciously so. Innumerable closeups show the generousness of the earth in Ohio, whether in flowers around the house or in the grain and vegetables of the fields. Day after day, the imponderable clouds drift by. Peas are shelled for dinner; the cows are brought in from the pasture by the collie dog; the farm hands return to the barn after a day of harvesting wheat. There is little more shown, in substance, and presently the film ends. But it leaves one with a conviction that this simple way of life in America cannot easily be changed, and that, as long as people of good hearts make records such as this, we cannot wholly forget that the Republic was founded on the plough." Movie Maker, Dec. 1940, 603-604.


On the Reef

Date produced: 1968

Filmmaker(s):

Graemer Grosvenor

Description:

"On the Reef can refer to only one place in the world and that's the Great Barrier Reef off the eastern coast of Australia. Graemer Grosvenor handled the world of sea life very nicely with a smooth flowing story of a group of young adventurers in this area of the unusual. This film from Australia had no difficulty in capturing the Nature Film Award" PSA Journal, Oct. 1968, 49.


Pets

Date produced: 1931

Filmmaker(s):

F. S. O'Hara

Description:

"Pets, 350 ft., 16mm., filmed by Dr. F. S. O'Hara, won its position on the list of special mention because of the many remarkably well composed closeups of family pets that it contains and because of the cameraman's patience and skill in securing many delightfully natural bits of action. Included in the film is a sequence of a cat and dog playing together. The film offers much grace and photographic beauty as well as that amazing attractiveness animals always possess on the screen." Movie Makers, Dec. 1931, 686.


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