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Big Adventure, The

Date produced: 1945

Filmmaker(s):

Henry E. Hird

Description:

"Excellent films have been made that show by more or less indirection what adults believe boys should do in camp. But what would boys like to do? Henry E. Hird, in The Big Adventure, seems almost to have thought with a boy's mind — a very real accomplishment for a busy executive — in producing this dramatic tale of boys in the woods. Two youngsters of about twelve years, armed with bows and arrows, are taken by their father on an island camping trip. Resigned, as most boys are under the instruction of their elders, they watch Father show them camp life in detail — and how he enjoys it! Suddenly he leaves for a war conference in Washington, and the two adventurers are alone for the night. A tramp appears, captures them, is outwitted by them and is seized by a helpful farmer. To bed and fears of invading bears go our heroes — when Dad returns, the conference deferred. It is a safe bet that young boys will approve Mr. Hird's dramatic movie as more realistic than some of the "approved solutions" offered to youthful campers." Movie Makers, Dec. 1945, 496.


Black Book and Camera

Date produced: 1967

Filmmaker(s):

Rose Dabbs

Stuart Dabbs

Description:

"Black Book and Camera has good old George, you know George, photographing all the pretty lassies at the World's Fair. He then asks for their names and addresses so that he can send them a photo. Wouldn't a black book full of names and addresses be worth a pretty penny? W-e-l-l. . . George gets a lot of pretty pictures, but as for those names and addresses. . ." PSA Journal, Aug. 1967, 37.


Bluff Island Idyll

Date produced: 1947

Filmmaker(s):

George Mesaros

Description:

"It takes a true craftsman to catch all the intimate and informal scenes that make a first rate vacation film, particularly when his exposure problems are complicated by the sunlight and shadows of a thickly wooded lake shore. But George Mesaros has succeeded in producing the sort of vacation record that most filmers only dream about. Mr. Mesaros has mastered his technical problems with an expert's hand and has turned out a stunning, vital movie of a summer outing in the Saranac Lake region. Faced with non-cooperative fellow campers, he had to be prepared to set up his tripod at a moment's notice; but the candid air of the proceedings on the screen is ample recompense for his vigilance. Bluff Island Idyll is a vivid testament to the importance of human interest and to the appeal of simple, everyday activities when they are properly sequenced and edited." Movie Makers, Dec. 1947, 513.


Bohemian Baloney

Date produced: 1944

Filmmaker(s):

Werner Henze

Description:

"Werner Henze has shown in Bohemian Baloney that artists can make fun of themselves and their profession. An artist and his wife had planned to have a quiet evening at the movies when a telephone call warns of a visit by a wealthy prospective buyer of pictures and her meek husband. How the young couple suddenly transform their own characters and their tasteful and immaculate living room into a scene of "arty" surroundings is gaily depicted with just the right amount of farce. The compositions and lighting are excellent and there are gay, unexpected twists throughout, particularly when a self portrait of the artist comes to life." Movie Makers, Dec. 1944, 495.


Building of “Conny”, The

Date produced: 1975

Filmmaker(s):

Robbins Barstow

Description:

"In 1975, Connecticut made the sperm whale its official state animal, as a symbol of conservation. The following year, a group of volunteers from the Connecticut Cetacean Society spent over 5,000 hours building a life-size, 60-foot, ferro-cement model of a male sperm whale, on the grounds of the Children's Museum in West Hartford, Connecticut, USA. Director of the project was Robbins Barstow, who filmed this dramatic, home-made documentary." Archive.org


By Sea To Florida

Date produced: 1931

Filmmaker(s):

Porter Varney

Description:

"By Sea To Florida, 400 ft., 16mm., made by Porter Varney of Bradenton, Fla., is a film record of a sea trip which derives its importance from the fact that the photography and choice of viewpoint are consistently exceptional. Parts of the ship, such as the rigging and cordage, the portholes, the lifeboat davits, etc., were used with rare artistry as aids to composition and effect. An expert use of filters produced exceptionally pleasing and truthful black and white rendition of the sea and the movement and sway of the ship. Continuity was effectually obtained by a shifting of the camera viewpoint, emphasizing the harbor, the high seas and the arrival in Florida. A startling climax to the film was given by a series of shots of an approaching hurricane captured by Mr. Varney 's intrepid camera." Movie Makers, Dec. 1931, 685.


Camera Makes Whoopee

Date produced: 1936

Filmmaker(s):

Norman McLaren

Violet Anderson

William J. MacLean

Description:

"The Annual Fancy Dress Ball at Glasgow School of Art: 'Something New Under the Sun'. Includes two ballets, 'Hungarian' and 'Machine Age' and animated sequences." National Library of Scotland Moving Image Archive.


Camp Pinnacle

Date produced: 1936

Filmmaker(s):

Robert F. Gowen

Description:

"The fact that the film, Camp Pinnacle, made by Robert F. Gowen, was provided with a clear spoken accompaniment served to enhance the workmanlike excellence of its cinematic presentation. Since it was a film made, avowedly, to sell to prospect parents the advantages of Camp Pinnacle, it would hardly have been fair to look for those more delicate nuances of atmosphere and sequence which may become a labor of love in the more personal film. Thus Camp Pinnacle was chosen for its excellence as a straightforward exposition, in glowing color, of every interesting aspect of the lives of the lads and their counselors at camp. In setting this forth, Mr. Gowen has chosen simple, natural sequences and has interpreted these with technical excellence and secure knowledge of the Kodachrome medium." Movie Makers, Dec. 1936, 551.


Canadian Capers

Date produced: 1932

Filmmaker(s):

Hamilton H. Jones

Description:

"Canadian Capers, filmed by Hamilton H. Jones, ACL, is a superlatively good vacation picture, complete in every important detail and containing several magnificent examples of sequencing. Among these is a satisfying study of a railway train. Mr. Jones neglected none of the cinematically interesting views that are unique to this subject and included several, such as scenes inside the engine cab, that ordinarily could not be secured. This picture has the important quality of conveying to the audience the maker's enthusiasm for the subjects filmed." Movie Makers, Dec. 1932, 560.


Canadian High Adventure

Date produced: 1953

Filmmaker(s):

Jerry More

Description:

"With the recent scaling of Mt. Everest, it is appropriate that a mountain-climbing film should be entered — and should win — in this year's Ten Best contest. Jerry More's Canadian High Adventure is such a picture. Obviously, Mr. More is a competent climber himself, as well as being a good movie maker, for the film presents an amazing variety of camera angles which make one question where the cameraman must have been to take them. For example, some scenes show the climbers crossing a crevasse from underneath, leaving you with the single assumption that the cameraman climbed down into the crevasse to shoot them. Excellent photography, competent editing and a friendly, well-written narrative all combine to make Canadian High Adventure an outstanding mountain-climbing study." Movie Makers, Dec. 1953, 320, 332.


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