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Unsung Heroes

Date produced: 1941

Description:

"Unsung Heroes, produced by The Calvin Company, has just about everything that a good industrial film ought to have. It is entirely in color, and the exposures are excellent, particularly in many shots of technical operations in the plant, which are ordinarily considered difficult. The subject embraces the manufacture, testing and rigid inspection of the component parts of a modern electric refrigerator. It is presented in a smooth, comprehensive way, with well delivered commentary and good incidental music,specially arranged to point up the action. The opening sequence, which shows a lip synchronized effect on a traveling outdoor shot, is unusually well done. However, the relation between this sequence and the rest of the film should have been more closely established." Movie Makers, Dec. 1941, 568.

"Unsung Heroes tells of the extreme care used in manufacturing electric refrigerators and of the exacting tests for durability, accuracy and silence of operation. Although the film is based on the familiar "trip through the factory" pattern, it has great interest for consumer audiences." Movie Makers, Jan. 1942, 8.


Let Your Body Breathe

Date produced: 1941

Filmmaker(s):

Kendall T. Greenwood

Description:

"Kendall T. Greenwood has told an interesting and uniformly attractive story of one of America's great integrated industries in Let Your Body Breathe. From the original Goodall Company plant in Sanford, Maine, to the elaborate retailing methods of the present day, the film presents a clear cut picture of Palm Beach cloth and its part in the modern pattern of warm weather living. Designed primarily for use within the trade, Let Your Body Breathe shows the retailer all the important points in the manufacture of this fabric, its tailoring by the parent company into suits and sportswear and the continued control over the product, even to such details as proper laundering or cleaning. Mr. Greenwood's camera work is crisp, his editing incisive, while the narrative contributes judiciously to an able industrial record." Movie Makers, Dec. 1941, 568.


Behind the Bale

Date produced: 1941

Filmmaker(s):

Paul Thompson

Description:

"Paul Thompson's Behind the Bale would be an amazing performance for a large studio, equipped with many facilities and numerous staff members, and this is true by reason of the exceedingly careful collaboration between the film editor and the comment writer. For a small producer of industrial pictures, Behind the Bale is a triumph in the technique of post recording, as well as a beautifully made picture that would stand on its own feet without narration and with relatively few titles. A Northwest brewer wishes to make it clear that the quality of hops has much to do with the quality of beer. Therefore, Mr. Thompson shows us the Yakima (Wash.) Valley briefly and then gets down to the special crop which the film pictures. We follow hops through planting, growing, picking and baling, in a Kodachromatic exposition that has rare beauty, and we end with four men enjoying the beer of Mr. Thompson's client. In the entire course of this fine piece of cinematography, there is a wizardry of cutting the film to fit the narration — and the reverse — that produces exposition timed with scene in a fashion that would do credit to the best industrial filmers anywhere." Movie Makers, Dec. 1941, 564.


Power Behind the Nation, The

Date produced: 1940

Filmmaker(s):

Waldo E. Austin

Description:

"Bituminous coal is the major actor in The Power Behind the Nation. This sound on film color movie, made by Waldo E. Austin for the Norfolk and Western Railway Company, shows effectively the tremendous part played by soft coal in the development of the nation. The picture is well filmed and thoroughly integrated by an excellent narrative, while lead and end titles are appropriately double exposed on shots of moving trains, which serve to drive home the point that the railroad is the important link between the mine and the consumer. Exceedingly fine sequences of coal mining and well handled shots of the railroad equipment are high points. This film is a fine example of an industrial motion picture produced without the excessive equipment and appropriations sometimes thought to be necessary for such an effort. " Movie Makers, Dec. 1940, 604.


Cavalcade of America

Date produced: 1940

Filmmaker(s):

Harley H. Bixler

Description:

"Harley H. Bixler, a technician, has been inspired with the might of America, and he has interpreted it according to his lights. In Cavalcade of America, taking our entire country as his canvas, he has painted in, with striking chromatic images, the physical and industrial high lights of our heritage. Here are the sinews of strength, awaiting only the activating force of human endeavor to turn them to the path of power. Here are the mills and the mines, the oil and the electricity, the farms and the factories without equal in our modern world. Mr. Bixler interprets his fine pictorial document with a narrative that is usually vivid but sometimes matter of fact and accompanies the whole with recorded music. Cavalcade of America is a striking study of a tremendous subject." Movie Makers, Dec. 1940, 602.


Story of Maytag, The

Date produced: 1936

Filmmaker(s):

Fred Maytag

Description:

"An outstanding example of what may be done with ordinary 16mm. equipment in the factory is to be found in The Story of Maytag, a black and white industrial film made by Fred Maytag, II. The problems of picturing the manufacture of washing machines in complete detail involved some tremendous lighting difficulties. Mr. Maytag handled these with ease, and throughout the film there is the conviction that the clear, clean photography scarcely could be improved. While the film was designed for use within the sales organization, the procedure of manufacture is so clearly pictured that it is not only comprehensible to the layman but interesting as well." Movie Makers, Dec. 1936, 548-549.


Wire and Cable Manufacture

Date produced: 1935

Filmmaker(s):

Robert F. Gowen

Description:

"Wire and Cable Manufacture, made by Robert F. Gowen, ACL, is a good example of what can be done with the presentation of heavy manufacturing processes. The many fine shots of large machines in motion as well as of rolling hot copper ingots were striking in their beauty. A careful record of the entire process of making a giant cable was worked out on short notice and was photographed in a short time. Many difficult lighting problems were overcome, and the result is an achievement that will do credit to the manufacturer's reputation and will add prestige to Mr. Gowen's cine fame." Movie Makers, Dec. 1935, 553, 555.


Commercial Production of Yeast, The

Date produced: 1935

Filmmaker(s):

William Schanzenbach

Description:

"A combination of time lapse cinemicrography and shooting huge factory interiors presented William Schanzenbach, ACL, with the gamut of technical difficulties in the photography of the four reel picture, The Commercial Production of Yeast. The interior shots of huge tanks and other machinery were not only adequately exposed but also were shot from attractive angles without extreme consciousness of camera angles. The laboratory sequences, in which time lapse technique was combined with work at the microscope to show the growth of yeast over a period of time, were well handled. Careful planning and clear titles add to the virtues of this exceptional industrial film." Movie Makers, Dec. 1935, 551.


Pouring a 200 Inch Telescope Mirror

Date produced: 1934

Filmmaker(s):

Edmund H. Wellech

Description:

"Pouring A 200 Inch Telescope Mirror, by Edmund H. Wellech, ACL, is a glorified industrial but greatly worthy as a clear record of one of civilization's milestones. Mr. Wellech's film, in addition to being an important scientific document, is, besides, a truly excellent cinematic achievement, for it makes an involved subject entirely understandable. The accomplishment of the single task of determining the correct exposure for scenes of molten glass against a dead black background is in itself a feat that would make the film outstanding. But, beside this, there are carefully worked out cinematic exposition and an approach to perfection in every aspect. As an engineer working at night for the Corning Glass Company, Mr. Wellech devoted his spare daytime hours to making this noteworthy film." Movie Makers, Dec. 1934, 546-547.


Mining Chrome Ore in New Caledonia

Date produced: 1933

Filmmaker(s):

Enoch Perkins

Description:

"An outstanding example of industrial record filming is Mining Chrome Ore in New Caledonia, by Enoch Perkins, ACL. Probably no amateur film ever was made under more unfavorable conditions and with as little opportunity to secure special equipment to meet them. Yet the photographic quality of this film is very high and it stands as a tribute to Mr. Perkins's ability to overcome obstacles. A large part of the picture was made in a mine where the atmosphere was so charged with moisture that it was necessary to stop and wipe the lens dry every few minutes. Although lighting was a tremendous task and often cables over a thousand feet long were required, the mine scenes are accurately exposed and well photographed. The picture gives a complete record of mining ore from the solid wall of the tunnels to the loaded freighter. It was filmed from an engineer's point of view and for the specific purpose of record; however, smooth continuity and editing maintain audience interest." Movie Makers, Dec. 1933, 500, 522.


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