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Treacherous Desert, The

Date produced: 1962

Filmmaker(s):

Jacob G. Monroy

Description:

"The zest for gold can impose a hardship upon one so fortunate as to find the metal. The prospector in this film chose the desert for his search, and with success until he realized that he was lost and without water. Another prospector happened by with a canteen of water. In the desert, the price of water can be very great as this thirsty prospector learned to his chagrin" PSA Journal, Oct. 1962, 36.


Tree Portraits

Date produced: 1956

Filmmaker(s):

William M. Harlow

Description:

'This film presents a revelation of the beauty and colorful activity of the trees of New York State. Beautiful time-lapse pictures show the emerging buds, leaves, and flowerings on the trees. The identifying features on tree branches, flowers, fruit, and bark are shown, utilizing time-lapse photography to show the moving detail," via SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry.


Trees That Grow in Brooklyn

Date produced: 1946

Filmmaker(s):

Leo J. Heffernan

Description:

"It is spring in Brooklyn, and Leo J. Heffernan has found a multitude of trees there. He opens the film with a sombre shot of New York's waterfront and skyline, to indicate the tense activity of a large city. A title suggests that those who live in the midst of this turmoil can find solace not far away. The film proceeds to the bounteous display of flowering trees in a large public park. Glowing shots of heavily laden branches against blue sky are interspersed with scenes of Sunday strollers wandering through shaded walks and falling petals. Mr. Heffernan has used to good effect his fine technical skill, and his color transitions between scenes are smoothly accomplished. Trees That Grow in Brooklyn is accompanied by a rhymed narrative written especially for the film by Mr. Heffernan." Movie Makers, Dec. 1946, 489.


Trees—A Picture Poem

Date produced: 1938

Filmmaker(s):

Ripley W. Bugbee

Description:

"In Trees, whose subtitle describes it as a picture poem, we find what is generally admitted to be the masterpiece of that superb artist of the cinema, the late Ripley W. Bugbee, whose work so delighted his fellow members of the Amateur Cinema League and whose untimely death took from amateur cinematography one of its finest workers. This film is the realization of what Movie Makers has often counseled — setting film to music, instead of the course usually followed in theatrical pictures of setting music to film. The footage is planned to gear in with the musical setting of Joyce Kilmer's popular verse, but, since that setting is brief, other music, excellently chosen, is added to the scoring. The music of the poem is played once orchestrally, then other selections are offered, and the presentation concludes with a baritone voice singing the musical setting through completely. In this last part of the film, there is admirable synchronism, the scenes illustrating the words very accurately. Within the framework of this mechanism, Mr. Bugbee placed some of the loveliest 16mm. Kodachrome footage that has ever been accomplished. The motion is all that of nature, no persons appearing, but that motion has tempo and rhythm, as well as amazing beauty. There are trees in all kinds of movement, and to them are added scenes of clouds, moving water, grasses, flowers and birds. Without the record accompaniment, one would find, in Trees, Kodachrome footage of the highest order; with the musical addition, there is something that, within its limited scope, has never been bettered." Movie Makers, Dec. 1938, 597, 617.


Trees: How to Know Them

Date produced: 1970

Filmmaker(s):

William M. Harlow

Description:

"This color film, released in partnership with the International Film Bureau Inc., presents the identifying features of trees as they change through the seasons. The bud and leaf scars of the deciduous broad-leaved trees are examined, as well as the distinguishing features of their bark. The cones and needles of the narrow-leaved evergreens are also described and compared. Extensive time-lapse photography shows the emergence of new leaves and flowers as spring arrives. Size, shape, and the arrangement of the buds and leaves on the twig are presented as ways of distinguishing and identifying trees, " via SUNY College of Environmental Science and Foresty.


Tremendous Seas, The

Date produced: 1931

Filmmaker(s):

George E. Mellor


Trilogy

Date produced: 1949

Filmmaker(s):

Timothy M. Lawler

Description:

"In Trilogy, Timothy M. Lawler, jr., submits an interesting and, for the most part, successful effort to match romantic verse with appropriately emotional scenes. For his verse, Mr. Lawler has used Kilmer's Trees, Malay's The Wide World and Shelley's Love's Philosophy. The moods of the movie footage are excellent. The verse suffers a little, however, because it is released on the screen (or in narrative readings) a couplet at a time, at varying intervals, thus breaking into the overall rhythm. On the whole, however, Trilogy is a good approach to an attractive and difficult ideal." Movie Makers, Dec. 1949, 471.


Tring and Thame Shows

Date produced: 1935

Filmmaker(s):

Eunice Alliott

Eustace Alliott

Description:

"Three short film sequences detailing competitions, parades and activities at local Agricultural Shows." (EAFA Database)


Trinidad Trails

Date produced: 1946

Filmmaker(s):

A. I. Willinsky

Description:

"Item is a film production of Dr. Willinsky's trip to Trinidad with his wife, Sadie. Filmed in the form of a travelogue, Willinsky intersperses footage of landmarks and the local population with captions that provide information about the country and its culture. Included are shots of sites around Port-of-Spain, cathedrals, mosques, a cricket match, a cocao bean farm, and the local population carrying out their daily activities. Sadie is regularly spotted sight-seeing and interacting with locals." Ontario Jewish Archives.


Trio-murder

Date produced: 1931


Total Pages: 292