E-mail us: amdb@ucalgary.ca

Date produced: 1950

Filmmaker(s):

Charles H. Benjamin

Languages:

English

Length:

400 ft

Format:

16mm

Colour:

Kodachrome

Sound:

Music score on records

Awards/Recognition:

American Cinematographer Amateur Movie Makers Contest, 1951 - Top Ten Award Winner
Home Movies Annual Contest, 1951- Documentary Films, Third Place Winner

Description:

"Ah! Wilderness: The stark beauty of remote mountain and plain areas, as yet untouched by the unrelenting surge of modern civilization, has been caught by Charles Benjamin's camera and Kodachrome film. Adapted from the book Stone Dust, by Frank Ernest Hill, Benjamin's film opens with scenes of mountain peaks and passes in winter- peaks mantled in snow, and trickling brooks that somehow have evaded the wintry grip of Jack Frost. The picture progresses in a like manner through Spring, Summer and Autumn, rendering a pictorial account of the ever-changing seasons in one of the few remaining wilderness areas of America. The picture discloses skillful camera handling as well as a talent for building interesting continuity through artful editing and titling." American Cinematographer, May 1951, 189

Resources:

Award reference in Home Movies, Feb. 1951, 48.

Discussed in "What Others are Shooting" (Home Movies, Jan. 1951, 15, 30).

Subjects:

Genre:

Form:

Screenings:

  • Screened by the Brooklyn Amateur Cine Club in 1949, Brooklyn, N.Y.

Screenings Map

Viewing Notes:

"The picture opens with well-centered and exposed titles and introduces the cover of the above book as an introduction. Then into an explanatory title, "The World in Which We Live and Sleep is Covered With Snow." Opening onto a beautiful scenic, the producer wastes no time in introducing that which will give tempo and substance to his film. This is a brook. The rushing waters gradually increase the tempo and one gets the feeling that all the world is anxious to throw off the chill of winter in a hurried approach to spring. Then to beautiful scenics of a still pond and the picture seems to say "spring." The grass and shrubbery get a little greener as the snow of winter melts and is carried off again in the hurried brook. Birds are seen returning to their natural homes in the forest and the world takes on a greener look." Home Movies, Jan. 1951, 30.


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