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Abelard Before a Mirror

Date produced: 1949

Filmmaker(s):

Stanley Fox

Description:

"Unedited assembly of takes (some with slates) from Fox's unfinished film, intended as a symbolic rendition of the story of Abelard (d. 1142) and Heloise (d. 1164). Uses masked actors, expressionistic lighting and movement, and visual metaphors suggestive of various emotions." (British Columbia Archives)


Ah! Wilderness

Date produced: 1950

Filmmaker(s):

Charles H. Benjamin

Description:

"Ah! Wilderness: The stark beauty of remote mountain and plain areas, as yet untouched by the unrelenting surge of modern civilization, has been caught by Charles Benjamin's camera and Kodachrome film. Adapted from the book Stone Dust, by Frank Ernest Hill, Benjamin's film opens with scenes of mountain peaks and passes in winter- peaks mantled in snow, and trickling brooks that somehow have evaded the wintry grip of Jack Frost. The picture progresses in a like manner through Spring, Summer and Autumn, rendering a pictorial account of the ever-changing seasons in one of the few remaining wilderness areas of America. The picture discloses skillful camera handling as well as a talent for building interesting continuity through artful editing and titling." American Cinematographer, May 1951, 189


Albert and the Lion

Date produced: 1940

Filmmaker(s):

A. Scott Moorhouse

Description:

"Devotees of the hilarious poem about the Lancashire couple and their son Albert would not fail to delight in Albert and the Lion, filmed by A. Scott Moorhouse. It portrays the misadventures of young Albert and his parents on their holiday at Blackpool, an English seaside resort. The story of how the objectionable young Albert, who carried a stick with a " 'orse's 'ead 'andle,'' was eaten by the lion is told in a highly satisfying manner. The scenes of the outlandishly costumed trio and their tribulations are timed to accompany a recitation of the poem. The characters are perfectly chosen and also outfitted to perfection. Although filmed at a Toronto zoo, the movie might well have been taken at the famous English resort of the poem. Mr. Moorhouse's handling of the players was masterly, and he made the best of his filming opportunities." Movie Makers, Dec. 1940, 601.


Asayiş Berkemal [All Quiet]

Date produced: 1967

Filmmaker(s):

Ahmet Soner

Description:

“Samim Kocagöz’ün “Teneke” adlı eserinden uyarlanmıştır. İşgüzar bir bekçinin uzun ve yorucu bir kovalamacanın ardından, yoksulluğunun gerçek yüzüyle karşılaşmasının öyküsüdür.” Sinematek.tv: http://sinematek.tv/asayis-berkemal-1967-2/ (15 Oct 2019).

“Adapted from Samim Kocagöz’s short story, “Teneke.” It tells the story of a meddlesome watchman/night guard, who faces the reality of poverty after a long and tiring chase.” Sinematek.tv: http://sinematek.tv/asayis-berkemal-1967-2/ (15 Oct 2019).


Black Cat, The

Date produced: 1965

Filmmaker(s):

Lance D. Hayes

Description:

"The Black Cat is a 25-minute version of Edgar Allen Poe's story by the same name and concerns a man who does away with his wife in what he believes to be the perfect crime, only to be outdone in the end by the family black cat. This low key, well dramatized version is the only 8mm film among the top ten and also received the MPD Scenario Film Award" PSA Journal, Sept. 1965, 50.


Book of Ruth, The

Date produced: 1939

Filmmaker(s):

C. Manley DeBevoise

Description:

"In the best tradition of filming technique, a movie should be an independent story telling medium. It should not require explanation or demonstration to make its meaning clear. Yet, there is no reason why this cardinal principle should not be violated, if the variation from accepted technique serves an artistic purpose. The Book of Ruth, by G. Manley DeBevoise, involves a new departure from tradition, for the film itself is an illustration in motion of the Biblical story, rather than a complete dramatization of the story. The tale is told by a narrator in synchronism with the appearance of the scenes on the screen, and, without the narration, the movie would be incomprehensible. Yet the two form a perfect unit which resents a fuller interpretation of the story of Ruth than would be possible by any other means. Costuming and selection of properties for this film are excellent and accurate. A church group worked for months in research to avoid anachronisms. The result is a splendid religious teaching film. The narration is given in person, and music is carefully scored by double turntable." Movie Makers, Dec. 1939, 636.


Brook, The

Date produced: 1933

Filmmaker(s):

James A. Sherlock

Description:

"It was based on Tennyson's poem and the scenes were made to fit the poem. This was very evident from the smoothness of the continuity. His photography secured a very high marking." American Cinematographer, Dec. 1934, 376.


Caperucita y el cineísta [Little Red Riding Hood and the filmmaker]

Date produced:

Filmmaker(s):

Eloy González Gavilán

Description:

El filme comienza con una mujer lavando sus manos y arreglando su cabello, después pone plantas en una canasta y camina felizmente por un sendero en el que recoge algunas flores. Un hombre (el cineasta) prepara su cámara en medio del campo, cuando de repente ve a la mujer y empieza a filmarla a la distancia. Después de varias tomas, el hombre se acerca a la mujer y habla con ella, para después irse juntos a un lugar más poblado. Cuando el cineasta deja su cámara y equipo en una banca, un grupo de gente sale de un edificio para perseguirlo con palos y horcas.

The film begins with a woman washing her hands and fixing her hair, she then takes some plants and a basket and walks happily through a path where she picks up some flowers. A man (the filmmaker) in the middle of the countryside is preparing his camera, when suddenly he sees the woman and starts making shots from a distance. After several shots the man approaches the woman talks to her and they leave together towards a more populated place. While the filmmaker leaves his camera and equipment on a bench, a group of people step out of a building to chase him with sticks and pitchforks.


Casey At The Bat

Date produced: 1956

Description:

"A picturization of the famous poem of the same name. The film is cut to fit the stanzas of the poem and the final scene is Mudville's despair as the mighty Casey struck out." PSA Journal, Nov. 1956, 45.


Dream of Eugene Aram, The

Date produced: 1927

Filmmaker(s):

Kennin Hamilton

Description:

"The special award, also of $500, went to Kennin Hamilton, of 28 Maitland Street, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, for his visualization of Hood's 'The Dream of Eugene Aram' in 16 millimeters. Mr. Hamilton played the principal role of Eugene Aram, disclosing a graceful pantomimic skill. The photography was handled by K. A. Mackenzie. A Cine Kodak, using Kodak Safety Film, was used. Mr. Hamilton had no special lenses or equipment and yet he achieved some singularly beautiful shots. Nature supplied his lighting, even for his interiors. A stepplader served as a tripod." Photoplay, Jun. 1928, 136.


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