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World Through a View Finder, The (Part II)

Date produced:

Filmmaker(s):

Edwin Mayer

Description:

"This amateur film captures Edwin and Minnie Mayer’s worldwide adventure across Australia, Asia, Africa, and Europe in the 1950s. This segment documents stops in Thailand, India, Egypt, Greece, Vatican City, Italy, the Netherlands, and England" Texas Archive of the Moving Image.


On the Trail of the Arch in England

Date produced: 1935

Filmmaker(s):

Robert W. Shearman


70° North

Date produced: 1961

Filmmaker(s):

L. Blackman

E. G. Edwards

C. G. Jowett

C. G. Jowett

Description:

"Almost every day of the year some 10 trawlers set out from the twin ports of Grimby and Hull, England, for the Arctic fishing grounds to return three weeks later with their cargo of deep sea fish. This film is a record of one such voyage with sound effects recorded on location. This will generate a nostalgic effervescence for those lovers of deep sea fishing and all will wish to join in the adventure without having to share in the work and inconvenience. The film moves with interest and excitement, a treat for all" PSA Journal, Oct. 1961, 47.


Moods of Nature

Date produced: 1934

Filmmaker(s):

Paul Brunford

Description:

" 'Moods of Nature' by Paul Brunford, recently won a prize in the Institute of Amateur Cinematographers' contest in England. Not only does Brunford show a fine sense of rhythm, but a keen eye for composition and a splendid sense of cutting and dramatic values in nature. This picture merely deals with a storm arising and then subsiding. Brunford uses both water and earth to show this. The smashing waves, bending trees and waving wheatfields combine to create his drama. His photography however, is something for which he is to be especially congratulated." American Cinematographer, Jan. 1936, 24.


In Linden Lea

Date produced: 1939

Filmmaker(s):

A. Scott Moorhouse

Description:

"In Linden Lea is A. Scott Moorhouse's tribute to a mother land, a tribute paid with distinction and an admirable warmth of feeling. We go to the English countryside, where Mr. Moorhouse sings, in film, the ancient refrain that Chaucer, Shakespeare, Gray, Wordsworth, Jefferies, Kipling and Brooke lifted in the English tongue. It is Mr. Moorhouse's good fortune and his sound cinematic ability that have permitted him to bring what he feels so strongly in a very direct fashion to his audience. His is the last sight of a peaceful England, recorded with vibrant emotion. "Rainbows; and the blue bitter smoke of wood; "And radiant raindrops couching in cool flowers; "And flowers themselves, that sway through sunny hours, "Dreaming of moths that drink them under the moon; " These, Mr. Moorhouse has greatly loved, as did Brooke, and in English woods, he would hope we shall "see no enemy, but winter and rough weather." In this beautiful Kodachrome footage are preserved the byways, the little ways, the errant and individual ways through which wander the casual cows, the meandering motors, the clopping carts and the quiet English, themselves, while to right of them and left of them are "English unofficial roses." And there is "honey still for tea" in this English land, and people to enjoy it, unhurried and unflurried. Mr. Moorhouse has pictured a way of life by suggestion, because his scenes are almost all with few human beings, but he has pictured it sharply and triumphantly, even if tenderly. In this brief essay in film is the essence of "This royal throne of kings, this scepter'd isle, "This earth of majesty, this seat of Mars, "This other Eden, demi-paradise; "This fortress built by Nature for herself "Against infection and the hand of war; '"This happy breed of men, this little world; "This precious stone set in the silver sea . . . "This blessed plot, this earth, this realm, this England." Movie Makers, Dec. 1939, 609, 631-632.