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Unsung Heroes

Date produced: 1941

Description:

"Unsung Heroes, produced by The Calvin Company, has just about everything that a good industrial film ought to have. It is entirely in color, and the exposures are excellent, particularly in many shots of technical operations in the plant, which are ordinarily considered difficult. The subject embraces the manufacture, testing and rigid inspection of the component parts of a modern electric refrigerator. It is presented in a smooth, comprehensive way, with well delivered commentary and good incidental music,specially arranged to point up the action. The opening sequence, which shows a lip synchronized effect on a traveling outdoor shot, is unusually well done. However, the relation between this sequence and the rest of the film should have been more closely established." Movie Makers, Dec. 1941, 568.

"Unsung Heroes tells of the extreme care used in manufacturing electric refrigerators and of the exacting tests for durability, accuracy and silence of operation. Although the film is based on the familiar "trip through the factory" pattern, it has great interest for consumer audiences." Movie Makers, Jan. 1942, 8.


Western Holiday

Date produced: 1937

Filmmaker(s):

Hamilton H. Jones

Description:

"Western Holiday offered one of those thrills in the sequence of sunrise on Mount Robson. Here Kodachrome caught, with what seemed magic, the first rosy glow on the cold, blue snow, which the continuity of photographic motion permitted to increase, to blossom and, finally, to blaze into a chromatic crown of jewels. To see this on the screen is to enjoy a rare experience. Hamilton H. Jones, in the highly intelligent cutting of his train sequences, gave the student of continuity another of these thrills. Those who are charmed by double turntable accompaniment will recognize the perfection with which an almost impossibly difficult feat of lip synchronization with record scoring has been handled. These are some of the higher spots in a film of unusually high general average. Mr. Jones is a Kodachrome movie maker of proved ability, who has made editing a special art. The film chosen for the first Hiram Percy Maxim Memorial Award will be used by Mr. Jones in his work as a lecturer on the vacation advantages of the Dominion of Canada, although it was made as his own enterprise, entirely at his own expense and not for compensation from a client. It is a part of his professional equipment. Briefly reviewed, Western Holiday carries the audience, via Canadian National Railways, from Victoria, Canada's most westerly metropolis, across the Rocky Mountains back to the Eastern Seaboard. Beginning with city views in Victoria and Vancouver, with strikingly colorful parades of the famous Canadian Mounted Police, we visit tourist centers and make trail trips from them. The camera goes into the interior of a glacier, it finds mountain goats and sheep, it clambers over the Continental Divide on horseback. All through the trip, it studies the progress of trains, weaving in and out of tunnels and over bridges. In his personal presentations of this film, Mr. Jones manipulates effects, such as whistles, bells, train noises and other oddments, with something approaching wizardry. In the face of competition of the highest order, Western Holiday is its own justification of preferment." Movie Makers, Dec. 1937, 602.


Which He Hath Planted

Date produced: 1946

Filmmaker(s):

Larry J. Fisher

Description:

"The Texas Forest Service was faced with a grave problem. Large parts of Texas were being devastated and deforested by numerous fires. The fires were caused by the idle fancy and carelessness of backwoodsmen. Which He Hath Planted was produced for the Service by Larry J. Fisher, ACL, as part of the campaign to lead these woodsmen into more constructive paths. It is a striking example of how, with imagination, a motion picture can be constructed to fit the needs of a very special situation. Mr. Fisher and the Forest Service had to find a common ground on which to base their appeal against the pyromaniacal instinct. Realizing that, however uneducated, most people from the backwoods have both acquaintance with and veneration for the Bible, they decided to peg their entire film on quotations from the Scriptures. What they have produced is a beautiful welding of applicable Biblical passages, both spoken and sung, to forest scenes, the end result tending to promote the idea that trees are rich and wondrous manifestations of God and are not intended by Him to be destroyed by man's casual whim. The lesson is well taught. But the film imparts a sense of beauty and reverence that far outlives the immediate lesson. For that, Mr. Fisher's blending of music and word and image is responsible." Movie Makers, Dec. 1946, 486.


Wooden Face of Totonicapan

Date produced: 1942

Filmmaker(s):

Ralph E. Gray

Description:

"“Wooden Face of Totonicapan” is a [1942] color film covering the art of making wooden masks in Totonicapan, Guatemala. The film was made under the auspices of the "Good Neighbor" film project, run by the Office of the Co-Ordinator of Inter-American Affairs in New York as part of the WWII war effort. It was produced by Ralph E. Gray." Periscope Film.


Work and Contemplation

Date produced: 1941

Filmmaker(s):

Kenneth F. Space

Description:

"On college student work campers from the Hartwick Seminary and the farmers' cooperative movement in Cooperstown." National Archives.


World of ‘68

Date produced: 1969

Filmmaker(s):

Charles Braverman

Description:

Produced by Pyramid Films, the film was originally shown on the Smothers brothers comedy hour television program and is a kinestasis film using kaleidoscopic views of still pictures to summarize the year 1968 (Archive.org).


Y West Side

Date produced: 1935

Filmmaker(s):

Robert M. Coles

Description:

"Y West Side, the joint production of Robert Coles, ACL, who directed the film, and Charles Coles and Edwin Schwarz, ACL, who photographed it, is a very successful publicity picture for the West Side Y. M. C. A. in New York City. Starting with the social and dormitory facilities of the "Y," the film carries the audience on a tour of gymnasiums, special exercise rooms, roof courts and pools. The abundance of athletic and exercise equipment is shown clearly in sequences of their use, and the carefully planned action throughout the picture maintains interest and continuity. This film is distinguished by excellent photography and by the successful solution of the innumerable problems in handling large scale interiors and group action. Ingenious adaptations of games and exercises were sometimes required in order to fit the scene to the camera field, determined by the exigencies of the space available. The talents of the three producers were so integrated as to make the enterprise an outstanding success." Movie Makers, Dec. 1935, 555.


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