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Watashi no kodomo [My Children]

Date produced: 1934

Filmmaker(s):

Mori Kurenai

Description:

A film capturing slices of everyday life, narrativizing Mori’s small children playing with each other.


What’s the Matter With Kids Today?

Date produced: 1971

Filmmaker(s):

Robert Zemeckis

Description:

"The film depicts a Boy Scout's walk through a rural setting. He's later joined by a group of children who follow him through meadows and corn fields." Chicago Film Archives


White North, The

Date produced: 1935

Filmmaker(s):

Myron Pettengill

Description:

"Myron F. Pettengill was awarded the trophy for Scenario pictures. This is a 16mm film of about 400 ft. It is a story of the Northwest Mounted. Pettingill is to be commended for his direction, his types, and the way in which he costumed his people. He injected little touches in his characters that left no doubt as to what they represented. He costumed them convincingly. It had many indoor scenes and of course a large amount of outdoor snow scenes. There was a fine handling of the camera." American Cinematographer, Jan. 1937, 25.


Whither Flowing

Date produced: 1928

Filmmaker(s):

Herman A. Heise

Description:

"Whither Flowing," depicts the nervous evils caused by parents in the thoughtless upbringing of children. The drama was compactly told, well acted and directed, and was marked by unusual photography." Photoplay, Nov. 1929, 67. "...Whither Flowing is a psychological study of hysteria.... Dr. Heise's Whither Flowing won second award in the dramatic division of the recent Photoplay Magazine contest...” Movie Makers, Feb. 1930, 104.


Worth Scouting For

Date produced: 1945

Filmmaker(s):

Alton Morton

Description:

"With the vitality of youth, the wonder of the woods and adolescent hunger for adventure, you have the ingredients for an excellent movie. Al Morton accepted the challenge offered by them, and turned out an interesting and competent film. Worth Scouting For has the indefinable quality that comes from fine filming, innate good taste and an understanding of boys' ways in the woods. Taking two independent youngsters and a large Boy Scout troop, Mr. Morton skillfully weaves a good story, based on the scorn of the two boys for the "sissy stuff" of Scouting. Both the troop and the boys go camping in the same area. The untrained campers make the mistakes avoided by the Scouts. They eat cold food because of their inability to build a fire; they become ill from smoking cigarettes which they have stolen; one almost drowns and is rescued by a Scout. They learn their lesson and decide that to "know how" is intelligent, not "sissy." A fine ability to film and direct youngsters with success makes Worth Scouting For an excellent picture which will be a delight to the actors in years to come. That, in itself, is a high accomplishment." Movie Makers, Dec. 1945, 495.


You’re Putting Me On

Date produced: 1969

Filmmaker(s):

Don B. Klugman

Description:

"This film seems to pick up the same couple from “I’ve Got This Problem” (played by Don Klugman and Judy Harris) a few years later, as they attend a swinging bohemian party where they pilfer personal objects from the unsuspecting guests." Chicago Film Archives.


Young America Paints

Date produced: 1940

Filmmaker(s):

T. W. Willard

Description:

"To the fascinating subject of finger painting, Willard Pictures has added its flawless color photography, and the result is Young America Paints. Finger painting is a subject highly suited to movies, in so far as the actual painting is concerned; but, when it comes to showing the results on such an extensive scale as was necessary in this film, a good deal of cinematic ingenuity is needed. Clear, direct presentation marks the entire picture, and the excellent narrative is powerful although unobtrusive. Fresh and interesting angles, together with unconventional lighting methods, serve to give the picture a pace and verve that the subject requires. This movie accomplishes its purpose in a most satisfactory manner, for nobody could see the film without feeling a strong urge to start finger painting for himself. That in itself is the greatest tribute that can be paid to a persuasive type of motion picture." Movie Makers, Dec. 1940, 601.


Youth Takes A Bough!

Date produced: 1940

Filmmaker(s):

Donald C. Fleck

Description:

"Glimpses of Life and Work in a School Forestry Camp "Somewhere in Scotland." (EAFA Database)


دختربس نمی‌خواست تنها باشد (Dokhtar Bas Nemikhast Tanha Bashad) [Dokhtar Bas Didn’t Want to be Alone]

Date produced: 1971

Filmmaker(s):

Naser Gholamrezayi

Description:

The story follows a little girl named “Dokhtar Bas” who catches a frog for her mother to cut open and put on her father’s infected knee injury. The next day the wound is disinfected and her father goes back to work in the wilderness. Dokhtar Bas looks at the dried up corpse of the frog and asks her mother if her father is truly healed now. Later in an attempt to revive the frog she first puts it in water, then catches another frog and like her mother cuts it open and places it on the dead frog’s corpse, tying them together. Checking the bandaged bundle the next morning she discovers two dead frogs and she asks her mother again whether her father really is completely healed now.


رویا (Roya) [Dream]

Date produced: 1973

Filmmaker(s):

Rashid Davari

Description:

The film follows a group of children living in the same alley. The garbage truck arrives every day disrupting their dreams. The sleepy children are forced to take the garbage out every time and play in the alley after the garbage are taken. The garbage truck stops coming to their alley, allowing them to finally sleep and dream for longer but also results in the neighbours throwing garbage in the alley, stopping the children from playing together.


Total Pages: 11