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En las Cruzadas [In the Crusades]

Date produced: 1974

Filmmaker(s):

Miguel Ángel Quintana

Description:

Film de animación que cuenta la anécdota de un caballero que tiene un encuentro casual cuando se dirige a las Cruzadas.

Animated film that tells the story of a knight that has a casual encounter as he travels to the Crusades.


Aquí, allá, en todas partes [Here, there and everywhere]

Date produced: 1971

Filmmaker(s):

Sergio García Michel

Description:

"Era una película que desarrollaba un tema muy propio de la contracultura de la época: la posibilidad de regresar a la naturaleza para vivir una vida al margen de la contaminación y de la vida moderna. Se trataba de una cinta de menos de diez minutos de duración, que contaba una historia breve pero ilustrativa de la naturaleza de los debates entre los jóvenes mexicanos cercanos a la contracultura. [...] La historia de Sergio García hacía una crítica al escapismo hippie, esperanzado por la posibilidad de crear un mundo alterno al de la realidad del capitalismo industrial" (Vázquez Mantecón, 2012).

"It was a film that developed a topic very related to the counterculture of the time: the possibility of going back to nature to live a life away from pollution and the modern life. The film lasted less than 10 minutes, and it told a brief but illustrative story about the nature of the debates between the Mexican youth that was close to the counterculture. [...] The story by Sergio García was a critique of the hippie escapism, hopeful for the possibility of creating an alternate world to the reality of industrial capitalism" (Vázquez Mantecón, 2012).


Dinosaur Dream

Date produced: 1995

Filmmaker(s):

Sidney N. Laverents

Description:

"Sid gets eaten by a Tyrannosaurus Rex." UCLA Film & Television Archive.


Skis Over Skoki

Date produced: 1939

Filmmaker(s):

John C. Jay, Jr.

Description:

"Filmed by John C. Jay, Jr., ACL, of Williams College, Skis Over Skoki was shown recently at the Eleventh Annual Show of Amateur Motion Pictures, sponsored by Duncan MacD. Little, ACL. Mr. Jay's film, which is 400 feet of 16mm. Kodachrome, accompanied by sound on disc, was made for the Canadian Pacific Railway and will be shown by them to major ski clubs throughout the country. The film outlines a short story of a girl who, having grown bored with the usual mountain trails, leaves her guide during one of the downhill runs and starts over treacherous territory alone. How she ends her journey and what happens en route are shown by Mr. Jay in some of his finest pictures of skiing, a field in which he is an expert. He has made several films of skiing in the past" Movie Makers, June, 1940, 279.


King of Allah’s Garden

Date produced: 1937

Filmmaker(s):

Stanley Bean

Mary Jane Bean

Description:

According to the filmmakers, "The scenario was our own—concerning the difficulties confronting a British telegraph company in maintaining communications between Uganda and the Sudan. A story requiring such foreign locale—Africa's desert, veldt and jungle—was written with the object of demonstrating to our audiences the cinema possibilities of our northeastern states" (111).


Hunting

Date produced: 1937

Filmmaker(s):

Cyrus Pinkham

Description:

"Hunting, cast of "Boy," played by Winthrop Rolfe, and "Dog," played by Teddy. Boy, walks with Dog through the forested mountainside, gazes at views over the alley, drinks water from a rushing stream, and kneels to shoot at birds." Notes by (NHF) Chris Reed and Chris Castiglia, June 2013


No Indian to Guide Them, or What is a Kemp

Date produced:

Filmmaker(s):

Meyer Davis

Description:

"Begins with a close-up intro of the Davis's in a small boat. One of the girls falls overboard and is saved. A woman drops her jewels overboard. Family disembarks. Finds a clue on a piece of paper. The Family sets out in boat with shovels, saws, axes, etc. Quarrel with another family. Find a deed." oldfilm.org


Barrier, The

Date produced: 1950

Filmmaker(s):

Glen H. Turner

Description:

"In The Barrier, Glen H. Turner, Maxim Award winner in 1949 with One Summer Day, shows that the excellence of that production was no happy accident. Although the two films are as different as night and day, both are instinct with the same qualities of creative imagination and true understanding of the movie medium. This year's production, as we understand it, is bi-lingual in its message. On the screen Mr. Turner tells a robust adventure tale, in which a wandering western horseman, attacked by unfriendly Indians, has to fight his way out of their clutches and (even more menacing) over the heart-stopping challenge of a great stone barrier to his freedom. Around this screen action, and carried by the narrative, the producer also draws a frame of universal reference to all of life's challenging struggles. Pictorially, the acting of the horseman is powerful and convincing, while Turner's camera treatment of his adventures creates a spine-chilling sense of danger and drama. Especially effective is the producer's handling of the Indians, whose menacing presence is suggested only — by moving shadows, braceleted brown arms or moccasined stealthy feet." Movie Makers, Dec. 1950, 466.


Chinese Handbag, The

Date produced: 1949

Filmmaker(s):

George Kirstein

Description:

"An idol stolen from a Chinese temple and the efforts of a loyal retainer to recover it provide George Kirstein with a novel springboard for the unfolding of this unusual travel film. Subsequent events carry the principals from New York to Chicago, through the Southwest to Los Angeles and Hollywood, up the coast to San Francisco and finally back to New York for restoration of the idol. Far from hindering the sightseeing sequences, Mr. Kirstein's device enhances the presentation of this material. While the camera handling is satisfying throughout, tighter editing would speed up the pace and heighten dramatic interest." Movie Makers, Dec. 1949, 471.


One Summer Day

Date produced: 1949

Filmmaker(s):

Glen H. Turner

Description:

"Neither the lead title nor the unpretentious opening scenes — as a small boy is seen building a crude toy boat — prepares the spectator for the pure enchantment of One Summer Day. For, almost unrealized even as it happens, the film melts with incredible smoothness from live action into animation and make-believe. The toy boat becomes a pirate galleon of old, a flower a maiden in distress and a twig her gallant suitor, as there unfolds a tale of romantic derring-do. Under cover of darkness, the pirates plot to kidnap the lady, whose protector, a humble fisherman, is away at his nets. He returns, only to be bested in the ensuing sword play, yet, undaunted, he still gives chase. With the help of a friendly whale, he overtakes the pirates, frees his lady and, as the galleon goes down in flames, the lovers return to shore, to live happily ever after. Then, as quietly as it all began, we are back at the edge of the sunlit pond. The boy lifts his boat from the water and turns homeward. And yet, through the true magic of the movies, we have entered for a brief moment childhood's enchanted world. Highly imaginative camera handling, technical skill and a keen sense of cinematic values make this an outstanding example of personal filming. The musical accompaniment and sound effects (including the cling-clang-cling of clashing swords) complement the picture perfectly. Glen Turner has added a new dimension to amateur filming with this simple story so superbly told in its brief 350 feet of 8mm. film." Movie Makers, Dec. 1949, 452-453.


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