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King of Allah’s Garden

Date produced: 1937

Filmmaker(s):

Stanley Bean

Mary Jane Bean

Description:

According to the filmmakers, "The scenario was our own—concerning the difficulties confronting a British telegraph company in maintaining communications between Uganda and the Sudan. A story requiring such foreign locale—Africa's desert, veldt and jungle—was written with the object of demonstrating to our audiences the cinema possibilities of our northeastern states" (111).


Treacherous Desert, The

Date produced: 1962

Filmmaker(s):

Jacob G. Monroy

Description:

"The zest for gold can impose a hardship upon one so fortunate as to find the metal. The prospector in this film chose the desert for his search, and with success until he realized that he was lost and without water. Another prospector happened by with a canteen of water. In the desert, the price of water can be very great as this thirsty prospector learned to his chagrin" PSA Journal, Oct. 1962, 36.


Land of Yesterday, The

Date produced: 1961

Filmmaker(s):

Kyle Holmes

Description:

"The wilderness of Colorado where the visitor may wonder how the Indian can extract a livelihood from the dry, treeless land. To be sure, there are trees, and some with the raiment of ghosts, from which life long ago departed. The rugged Indian does eke a living from this waste, mostly from sheep, goats, weaving, and trinkets. The film is a record of these things in well chosen settings, including a desert storm" PSA Journal, Oct. 1961, 49


The Canteen

Date produced: 1960

Filmmaker(s):

M.P. Moore

Description:

"A story of two bad guys on the loose and three others on their trail in the dry desert. We move over the desert floor and into the hills for some gun play. The need for water is so pressing that the fight centers about a canteen of water which becomes the center of no-mans-land. The bad gys meet their fate and the canteen is empty from bullet holes. The actors do a credible job in a chapter from a "Western" PSA Journal, Nov. 1960, 40-41.


All Nature Sings

Date produced: 1960

Filmmaker(s):

Glenn Wenger

Description:

"Wildflowers and desert life of some of the birds and small animals have called many but few have captured the beauty with such ease and grace. There is an intimacy with all the creatures as we watch them feed and play and the birds nest in the cactus, feeding and training the young. Those who live with and appreciate the desert will be delighted with this gem of a nature film" PSA Journal, Nov. 1960, 39.


Water Wheel

Date produced: 1958

Filmmaker(s):

Glen H. Turner

Description:

"Glen H. Turner brings to us the song of the desert and the water wheel that turns continuously. We move from the melting snows on to the streams, lakes and rivers. The churning rivers, increasing in power and rhythm, brown with the soil of the desert, the power for the water wheel. The slow, great turning water wheel pours forth the brown water, the life of vegetation in the gray hills, casting its shadow, its red shadow in the setting sun" PSA Journal, Nov. 1958, 46.


Whispering Sands

Date produced: 1957

Filmmaker(s):

Kyle Holmes

Description:

"Kyle Holmes has also turned his camera toward the recording of Shifting Whispering Sands and has used scenes of the desert country to blend with the old desert character. This film is less critical in the use of scenes, leaving to the imagination the privilege of filling in some of the details. It is most unusual that two almost identical films are entered in the same contest. It happened here and the two films were rated as almost equal" PSA Journal, Nov. 1957, 53.


Shifting Whispering Sands

Date produced: 1957

Filmmaker(s):

O. L. Tapp

Description:

"O.L. Tapp has coupled opportunity and imagination in putting motion pictures to the recording "Shifting Whispering Sands." Finding the right kind of material to photograph must have entailed a great deal of planning and searching. Every scene is a work of art. As one watches the scenes unfold to the music and song he feels compelled to sit in contemplation of the lonesomeness of the great desert." PSA Journal, Nov. 1957, 33.


Carabi Incident, The

Date produced: 1952

Filmmaker(s):

Harry W. Atwood

Description:

"Once again Harry W. Atwood has used the desert locales of the Southwest and his mastery of outdoor color filming to mount a dramatic and exciting action picture. Although The Carabi Incident is truly an incident rather than a full-fledged photoplay, it does manage to include an abandoned mine, a lost prospector, a worried young girl and her companion — and both a happy and a tragic ending! The production is enriched with Mr. Atwood's usually fine selection of camera angles and suspenseful editing. For these reviewers, however, an excess of dialog subtitles was a drag on the film's development." Movie Makers, Dec. 1952, 341.


Rainbow Fantasy

Date produced: 1943

Filmmaker(s):

Charles C. Hammack

Description:

"Rainbow Fantasy, in the words of Charles C. Hammack, is "an attempt to produce — not a conventional travelog — but more a story of adventure, a hiking adventure to what is probably one of the least visited of our national monuments, Rainbow Bridge, in southeastern Utah." In achieving this goal, Mr. Hammack has been largely and creditably successful. For him and his young wife, Rainbow Bridge takes on the aura of a lost horizon, a Shangri La protected from the outside world by the blistering desert heat and the brutal desert rocks. He brings this overtone of feeling to his film, both through his imaginative camera treatment of the subject and the intentionally dramatic acting of the two travelers. Mr. Hammack's is a new name in Ten Best competition, but it is one which we believe will be heard again."Movie Makers, Dec. 1943, 478.


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