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Through Our National Parks

Date produced: 1933

Filmmaker(s):

Robert W. Shearman


Glacier Park from a Railway Train

Date produced: 1932

Filmmaker(s):

Edward K. Warren


Denali

Date produced: 1962

Filmmaker(s):

Dorothy Ruth Orr

Othel G. Goff

Description:

"Denali, the high one, takes us into the Park at the base of Mt. McKinley in Alaska to give us a better acquaintance with the animals that live in the 49th state with the long, cold winters. We visit with the bears, the big ones, the moose, fox, sheep, birds, and the busy beaver. We learn that the beavers work during the short summer season cutting, gathering, and storing leafy branches for winter food. There are many close-up views of the animals feeding and doing things wild animals do" PSA Journal, Oct. 1962, 33.


Monarchs of the Mountain Tops

Date produced: 1953

Filmmaker(s):

Ralph O. Lund

Description:

"Ralph O. Lund, whether he knows it or not, has adopted the same narrative technique used earlier in a nature film (The Gannets) whereby one of the wild creatures being pictured becomes the narrator. In Monarchs of the Mountain Tops, Mr. Lund's "Pete Smith" is an agile and bewhiskered mountain goat. His recurring comments enliven considerably the producer's study of the flora and fauna of Glacier National Park." Movie Makers, Dec. 1953, 334.


Mountain Playground

Date produced: 1952

Filmmaker(s):

L. Gordon Darby

Description:

"With a thorough understanding of what constitutes human interest, L. Gordon Darby has produced in Mountain Playground an attractive record of the Banff-Jasper National Park area. Present, to be sure, are the majestic peaks, the Banff Springs Hotel with its surrounding flower gardens, Lake Louise and a picturesque river trip. But there are presented also the darting antics of a chipmunk, the dainty distrust of a cautious deer and the hungry bear within arm's reach of the camera. If camera steadiness had not been sacrificed for the ease of the hand-held camera, this attractive travelog might well have contended for higher honors." Movie Makers, Dec. 1952, 340.


What God Hath Wrought

Date produced: 1951

Filmmaker(s):

Leo J. Heffernan

Description:

"Leo J. Heffernan's 'What God Hath Whrought" pictures some of the wonders of Nature, with emphasis on the mighty Niagara Falls. His color photography is excellent." American Cinematographer, May 1952, 224.

"While motoring through Zion National Park, Leo J. Heffernan photographed the mountains, trees and canyons as they passed by his camera. The resulting picture, What God Hath Wrought, filmed almost entirely from his moving car, has an amazing three-dimensional effect. Changes in depth and perspective give the viewer a strong sense of participation, a true feeling that he is actually on the spot. For, traveling along the main highways, where so many tourists drive each year, Mr. Heffernan shows us this usually static subject from a tourist's level — but with new and refreshing viewpoints." Movie Makers, Dec. 1952, 341.


I Walked a Crooked Trail

Date produced: 1950

Filmmaker(s):

O. L. Tapp

Description:

"In I Walked a Crooked Trail, O. L. Tapp has lured a good deal of motion and humor out of what must be one of the world's most static subjects — the Arches National Monument. Remembering that story interest is an important part of cinematics, Mr. Tapp has kept his very competent camera trained on continuous human action, letting his travelog unwind itself, very subtly, as a background. The film is limited by the essential triviality of its theme — the unfolding of a practical joke. But within its limits it does very well indeed." Movie Makers, Dec. 1950, 467-468.


Isle of the Dead

Date produced: 1950

Filmmaker(s):

Timothy M. Lawler

Delores Lawer

Description:

"Films about national parks and monuments fall into the traps of banality with greater ease than almost any other variety of footage. It was. therefore, with great delight that the judges reviewed Timothy and Delores Lawler's Isle of the Dead. For, using the famed Boecklin painting and the equally known Rachmaninoff music as theme and atmosphere, the Lawlers have produced a cinematic tone poem from the materials offered by Yellowstone and the Badlands. Their efforts completely dominate both music and painting, which become effective substrata of the esthetic whole. The film's great virtue and its slight defects spring from the same source — the single mood that the Lawlers have worked for and have achieved." Movie Makers, Dec. 1950, 464-465.


Death Valley

Date produced: 1933

Filmmaker(s):

Elton W. Walker


Yellowstone National Park

Date produced: 1931

Filmmaker(s):

E. F. G. Chapman


Total Pages: 6