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Wake of the Bluenose

Date produced: 1960

Filmmaker(s):

Ken Cucksey


Water Country, The

Date produced: 1934

Filmmaker(s):

Khoji Tsukamoto

Description:

"A detailed study of a Japanese waterside community, emphasising their dependence on boats for most aspects of their lives. Catching fish, getting from home to the fields and taking produce to market. Significant detail of rural subsistence - fertilising fields, cutting rushes and women using foot-powered water wheel." (EAFA Database)


Water Wheel

Date produced: 1958

Filmmaker(s):

Glen H. Turner

Description:

"Glen H. Turner brings to us the song of the desert and the water wheel that turns continuously. We move from the melting snows on to the streams, lakes and rivers. The churning rivers, increasing in power and rhythm, brown with the soil of the desert, the power for the water wheel. The slow, great turning water wheel pours forth the brown water, the life of vegetation in the gray hills, casting its shadow, its red shadow in the setting sun" PSA Journal, Nov. 1958, 46.


Waters of Lodore

Date produced: 1951

Filmmaker(s):

Alton Morton

Description:

"Waters Of Lodore - Unlike most letter carriers who go for a hike on their vaction, letter-carrier Morton and a party of friends set out on a boating adventure down the Colorado river during his 1950 summer vacation. Morton recorded the adventure from start to finish, and edited the footage into an absorbing documentary having many thrilling moments. Although the picture is a little slow getting started -the preparation and get-away sequences being somewhat overly- lenghty -the picture, once the boats get underway, is packed with interest and not a few thrills. It must have been a monumental job making movies on such an arduous journey, for it was often a tough enough job just to keep the boats afloat. Staging the boat action in the rougher waters required infinite patience and camera skill, but Morton has been rewarded with some excellent shots of his fellow-boatmen navigating the dangerous rapids. Morton shot the picture on 16mm Kodachrome at 24 f.p.s., hoping later to combine the narration on a sound print. At present, the narration is recorded on wire and synchronized with the picture." American Cinematographer, May 1952, 224.


We Are All Artists

Date produced: 1936

Filmmaker(s):

Alon Bement

Description:

"We Are All Artists, traces our experience of the aesthetic in the everyday; it begins by considering the related categories of beauty, art, and craftwork before moving on to suggest some of the many ways that modern art and design have made our world more beautiful. Offering a broad definition of art as any "skillful or purposeful endeavor," the film suggests that we are all artists to the extent that we exercise aesthetic judgement through a range of quotidian activities. The film presents a montage sequence showing a woman cleaning, men painting a wall, a letter being typed, and activities in gardening and pottery and then concludes by proposing that even "exercising the powers of selection" —as in purchasing a hat—makes use of some attributes of the artist" (Tepperman, 237-238).


Weekend Cruise

Date produced: 1950

Filmmaker(s):

L. Clyde Anderson

Description:

"Footage of a boating trip on the Great Salt Lake. Views of the shoreline, passengers, raising and lowering of sails, sunset, the galley, dinner and sleeping accommodations. Also, views of the boat from the shore and unloading the boat at dock." University of Utah Marriott Library.


Welcome Lane

Date produced: 1954

Filmmaker(s):

Peter B. Delaurenti

Description:

"To capture the spirit of a day-long welcome to homecoming Korean veterans is not an easy task. But Pete Delaurenti has managed it in a remarkably complete coverage in true newsreel style. Cutting from shots of the great troopship edging up to the dock in Seattle, to the crowds waiting to embrace returning veterans - the genuine and touching family reunions, the slightly bewildered beauty queens, the governors' paternal reception of a chosen native of each state and the inevitable parades - Mr. Delaurenti seems to have been endowed with multiple hands, feet and even cameras. Welcome Lane is a moving record of a difficult subject, accomplished with good taste" PSA Journal, Jan. 1955, 51.


Welcome San Francisco Movie Makers

Date produced: 1960

Filmmaker(s):

Frank S. Zach

Description:

"Welcome San Francisco Movie Makers opens with a montage of classic San Francisco sights, setting the backdrop for the first meeting of the San Francisco Movie Makers Club. After an introduction of the club’s members and its activities, filmmaker Dr. Frank S. Zach, along with his wife Helga, proceeds to demonstrate the proper use of 8mm and 16mm cameras and film sound recording techniques. Shot, scripted, edited, hand titled and over dubbed with music by Dr. Zach, this film seeks to encourage, teach, and recruit image makers." centerforhomemovies.org


West Texas Panther Hunt

Date produced: 1938

Filmmaker(s):

Tom D. Park

Description:

"'West Texas Panther Hunt,' by Tom D. Park of Tulsa, Okla., caused the averting of more than one pair of feminine eyes as the dogs closed in on the big cat, which cuffed them back and might have won freedom except for the man behind the gun behind the dogs" American Cinematographer, April, 1938, 173.


West Virginia, The State Beautiful

Date produced: 1929

Filmmaker(s):

Ottis Rymer Snodgrass

Description:

"West Virginia, the State Beautiful is organized as a series of scenic vignettes taken during an auto trip eastward on Route 60, known as the Midland Trail .... This route, first proposed by George Washington in 1783, had been upgraded for automobiles in the 1920s and is portrayed here as a source of civic pride. Rev. Snodgrass probably screened his 75-minute travel documentary for church and civic groups. The five excerpts included here begin with the start of the tour in the border town of Kenova, whose name is laid out in an intertitle (“KEN. O. VA.”) to drive home its derivation from the first letters of the states the town touches: Kentucky, Ohio, and (West) Virginia. In Huntington, Route 60 runs down busy Fifth Avenue and past the International Nickel Company, opened six years earlier and rightly labeled in the titles as the world’s largest nickel alloy plant. Farther east in the higher Appalachians are glimpses of sheer “LOVER’S LEAP” cliffs (before the Hawks Nest Dam was built in the 1930s) and lumber-industry trains geared for the steep hills. Rev. Snodgrass closes with a homemade sing-along slide for the state song, “The West Virginia Hills.”" —Scott Simmon


Total Pages: 56