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Mission Alpha Centauri

Date produced: 1967

Filmmaker(s):

David Nason

Description:

"Teenagers...embark on a space mission to explore Alpha Centauri, the second closest star to Earth. The film follows the astronauts during the preparation for their mission, their journey through space, and finally, their encounters with life on Alpha Centauri. The end of the film portrays the astronauts and the Alpha Centaurians coming together in a utopian gathering, complete with cheerleaders, a pony, and an astral princess." Andrea McCarty, http://oldfilm.org/content/mission-alpha-centauri-0


Child’s Introduction to the Cosmos, A

Date produced: 1967

Filmmaker(s):

Hal Barwood

Description:

"A Child's Introduction to the Cosmos is a humorous attempt to describe, in child language, what the Cosmos must be like. Actually, the charm of this film comes in its telling. Somehow the message doesn't matter too much" PSA Journal, Aug. 1967, 37.


From the Void

Date produced: 1959

Filmmaker(s):

Dick Jefts

Description:

"A rather clever and well-executed story of the rocket engineer who recovered the important capsule when it returned to earth. The rocket launching is done with miniature and to the credit of the filmer. The rocket engineer does not fully appreciate what he has accomplished until it is too late. Sound effects accompanying the picture create a sense of realism" PSA Journal, Nov. 1959, 48.


Uranus

Date produced: 1951

Filmmaker(s):

Jack E. Gieck

Description:

"Jack E. Gieck's film is a fanciful abstract study delineating the aspect and activity of the planet Uranus. In it he has wisely kept his footage brief. His lighting effects on models of the mountains and the color patterns of liquids reflect an imaginative concept. A rather too soft focus toward the end of Uranus is somewhat unexplainable, but his choice of an excellent musical score contributes to a fascinating creative experiment." Movie Makers, Dec. 1951, 412.


Doomsday

Date produced: 1935

Filmmaker(s):

Ruth Stuart

Description:

"Science fiction film influenced by the style of inter-war European art cinema." East Anglian Film Archive.

"Each year the contest sponsored by the American Society of Cinematographers through this magazine seems to bring forth a surprise. For several years the 8mm cinematrographers have been setting the pace, but never has any of them reached the goal achieved this year by Miss Ruth Stuart. Miss Stuart has been a contributor to this contest every year for the past three years; in 1933 she was given the medal for travel pictures. Her 200 ft. 16mm subject 'Doomsday' was also awarded honors in the British Institute of Amateur Cinematographers. In the American Society of Cinematographers contest just closed she was given a recognition for the Outstanding picture, in photography and Documentary pictures. It will be surprising to many that this unusual honor should befall a woman. Photography, by the unwritten law, is supposedly the realm of male species. Miss Stuart, however showed such a fine understanding of the value of pictures that move, how to fabricate these moving photographs into an interesting document that would hold any audience anywhere in the civilized world. For a person who films she must have developed a stony heart in order to cut as judiciously as the picture indicates. There is a tempo to the production that is very seldom achieved by an amateur. There are no obvious pet shots or scenes. Each sequence, each scene, each picture was left in production for a purpose to give it atmosphere to help the story along." American Cinematographer, Jan. 1937, 25.


Solar Pelexus

Date produced: 1936

Filmmaker(s):

Mel Wesleder

Harry French

Description:

"Mel Weslander and Harry French of San Francisco, with 'Solar Pelexus,' were winners of Agfa's contribution of six rolls of film. As the misspelling of the title indicates, the subject was a farce portraying the journey of two men to another planet in a rocket." American Cinematographer, Jan. 1938, 28.