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[Construction of a Sewage Treatment Plant]

Date produced: 1932

Filmmaker(s):

Sherman A. MacGregory

Description:

"The seven reel industrial film made by Sherman A. MacGregory, ACL, of the construction of a sewage treatment plant was placed among the year's ten best because of its exact and thorough handling of a difficult subject. For more than five months Mr. MacGregory served as construction engineer and cameraman on a job that progressed slowly through many stages. But only by recording in detail all of these stages could he make the film serve its purpose efficiently as an office record — with the result that 4000 feet of 16mm. film were exposed in the process. In the final, carefully edited and titled edition, Mr. MacGregory has achieved and sustained definite interest, even for the layman, in a film subject that threatened monotony at every turn. Unusual and effective camera positions played a large part in this as a complement to the exact production and editing." Movie Makers, Dec. 1932, 560.


Art of Photo Engraving, The

Date produced: 1930

Filmmaker(s):

Edward J. Schon

Description:

"The Art of Photo Engraving, 1600 ft., 16mm., filmed by Edward J. Schon, tells the story of photo engraving from the first step to the last. It makes the complete process clear to the nontechnical audience while its interest to the engraver is such that Mr. Schon was invited to attend the recent American Photo Engravers' Convention in Philadelphia to screen the film and speak on his experiences in making it. It is probable that this excellent amateur made industrial has initiated a series of similar films on the same topic. Because of the unusually careful focusing and consistently even exposure, in spite of the wide variety of lighting conditions met with in interior scenes, this film is photographically outstanding. The continuity, presenting the plant's operations in natural sequence, is commendable for its clarity, particularly in view of the numerous complicated processes featured." Movie Makers, Dec. 1930, 759.


Art of Universal Winding, The

Date produced: 1943

Filmmaker(s):

Morton H. Read

Description:

"Morton Read's industrial picture, The Art of Universal Winding, serves a special purpose very convincingly. His client had difficulty in attracting girls to his factory, because the work of wire winding had, in the past, not gained social acceptance in many New England communities. Mr. Read's task was to show that wire winding is an important wartime occupation, that it is interesting, safe and pleasant and that women of superior types are to be found in it. The chief performer in the film is a fine looking woman of dignity and evident character who illustrates the work which must be learned by new employees. The movie is not only educational, as a true training film should be, but it adds its special message naturally and effectively." Movie Makers, Dec. 1943, 474.


Behind the Bale

Date produced: 1941

Filmmaker(s):

Paul Thompson

Description:

"Paul Thompson's Behind the Bale would be an amazing performance for a large studio, equipped with many facilities and numerous staff members, and this is true by reason of the exceedingly careful collaboration between the film editor and the comment writer. For a small producer of industrial pictures, Behind the Bale is a triumph in the technique of post recording, as well as a beautifully made picture that would stand on its own feet without narration and with relatively few titles. A Northwest brewer wishes to make it clear that the quality of hops has much to do with the quality of beer. Therefore, Mr. Thompson shows us the Yakima (Wash.) Valley briefly and then gets down to the special crop which the film pictures. We follow hops through planting, growing, picking and baling, in a Kodachromatic exposition that has rare beauty, and we end with four men enjoying the beer of Mr. Thompson's client. In the entire course of this fine piece of cinematography, there is a wizardry of cutting the film to fit the narration — and the reverse — that produces exposition timed with scene in a fashion that would do credit to the best industrial filmers anywhere." Movie Makers, Dec. 1941, 564.


Blow the Wild Whale

Date produced: 1954

Description:

"BC Packers (Western Canadian Whaling Ltd.) whaling operations, based at Coal Harbour. Whaling ship departs; whale is sighted and harpooned; whale struggles and dies. Flensing and processing of whale carcass at Coal Harbour -- products are frozen ground whale meat and mink feed. Sequence on preparation of harpoons, followed by another whaling trip aboard the Polar V. Several sequences appear to be in slow motion." (BC Archives)

The Western Canada Whaling Company was a sub-division of British Columbia Packers Limited.

The filmmaker is not identified. Film begins with the credit "British Columbia Packers presents..."


British Columbia Salmon from Sea to Can

Date produced: 1945

Filmmaker(s):

George J. Alexander

Description:

"Shows the salmon spawning cycle, methods of commercial purse-seine and gillnet fishing, and processing of the catch at the cannery; includes footage of an "Iron Chink" salmon butchering machine. Filmed at unspecified locations on the BC coast." (BC Archives)

Additional credit: "Produced by the British Columbia Provincial Fisheries Dept."


Building a Bakery 1930 : Harvesting and Baking

Date produced: 1930

Filmmaker(s):

Dent Harrison

Description:

"The construction of the POM (Pride of Montreal) Bakery in Montreal. Some commercial harvesting footage with baking at POM." (LAC description)


Commercial Production of Yeast, The

Date produced: 1935

Filmmaker(s):

William Schanzenbach

Description:

"A combination of time lapse cinemicrography and shooting huge factory interiors presented William Schanzenbach, ACL, with the gamut of technical difficulties in the photography of the four reel picture, The Commercial Production of Yeast. The interior shots of huge tanks and other machinery were not only adequately exposed but also were shot from attractive angles without extreme consciousness of camera angles. The laboratory sequences, in which time lapse technique was combined with work at the microscope to show the growth of yeast over a period of time, were well handled. Careful planning and clear titles add to the virtues of this exceptional industrial film." Movie Makers, Dec. 1935, 551.


Commercial Salmon Trolling off the British Columbia Coast

Date produced: 1946

Filmmaker(s):

George J. Alexander

Description:

"The coho and spring salmon trolling industry of Vancouver Island's west coast. Includes footage of boats, types of tackle, catching and cleaning fish, buying stations, delivery to the wharf, etc. The packer Co-Operator II is shown." (BC Archives)
The film was shot between 1941 and 1946.
Additional credit: "Produced by the British Columbia Provincial Fisheries Dept."
Additional credit: "This picture was produced with the kind co-operation of the Kyoquot Trollers Co-operative Association."


Eyes Of Science, The

Date produced: 1931

Filmmaker(s):

Melville Webber

James Sibley Watson

Description:

"The Eyes Of Science, 3000 ft., 35mm., planned and photographed by J. S. Watson, Jr. and Melville Webber, is exceptional for continuity treatment and photography alike. Conceived primarily as an industrial film of a very high order, the final result is a veritable tour de force in the technical accomplishment of film exposition. Telling the story of lens making and culminating in representation of the impressive and complicated optical machinery which plays an important part in modern art and industry, the smoothness of the continuity is plainly the result of careful calculation of the interest value of the whole as well as of every small part. Multiple exposures, lap dissolves, color and microcinematography, as well as a number of surprising photographic effects, give this film a technical interest much above the average. Of these, some of the exceptional examples are the photography of light rays passing through prisms and lenses; a recording of the phenomenon of Newton's Rings in color; a scene showing a subject, together with its image on the ground glass of a camera; strains in a structure revealed by polarized light and many other remarkable shots. In short, the combination of cinematic art and skill with which this film is composed places it well in the front rank of all existing industrials regardless of the source of their production." Movie Makers, Dec. 1931, 657.

"Made in collaboration with Melville Webber for Bausch & Lomb Optical Co. Included: glass making, grinding, and polishing lenses and prisms, manufacture and principles of operation of microscopes, telescopes, and other optical instruments" (Unseen Cinema, 114).


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