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Light Shines in Bakubaland, The

Date produced: 1941

Filmmaker(s):

Ray L. Garner

Description:

"On an actual Protestant missionary who brought Christianity, education, and medical aid to an illiterate, pagan tribe in the Belgian Congo." National Archives.


Mission Achievements

Date produced: 1939

Filmmaker(s):

Ray L. Garner

Description:

"On the Baptist Kimpese Mission Station, Republic of the Congo." National Archives.


Moroccan Cities

Date produced: 1936

Filmmaker(s):

Gwladys Wynne Sills

Description:

"Moroccan Cities, by Gwladys Sills, stands out among amateur travel studies for its very real achievement of that intangible something — glamor. The mystery of shrouded Arabs, the glare of white buildings in the sunlight and the fascinating pulsation of life in the native markets, all these have been captured with marked success in this one reel record. To accomplish this, Mrs. Sills has brought into play a fine feeling for human interest and a genuine flair for the dramatic in photographic, treatment. Her material has been critically edited and sensitively titled, with that selectivity which is an artistic necessity in all real creative work." Movie Makers, Dec. 1936, 542.


Morocco on my Mind

Date produced: 1970

Filmmaker(s):

Maurice Krakower

Description:

"Morocco on my Mind by Maurice Krakower, a PSA member of Glen Head, N.Y. Maurice has taken the subject of a little visited area and made a winning film with a most unusual narrative treatment. This 16-minute 16mm film was awarded the PSA-MPD Gold Medal and the Travel Film Award" PSA Journal, Nov. 1970, 38.


Ngono and Her People

Date produced: 1938

Filmmaker(s):

Ray L. Garner

Description:

"About a 9-year-old African girl, found by Protestant missionaries in the French Cameroons and reared in a mission school, who later marries a native teacher and returns to help her village." National Archives.


Portuguese Pot-Pourri and Moroccan Mélange

Date produced: 1950

Filmmaker(s):

A. I. Willinsky

Description:

"Item is a double feature production of a trip Dr. Willinsky took to Portugal and Morocco with his wife, Sadie. In the form of a travelogue, footage of landmarks, landscapes, vegetation, historic sites and the local population is interspersed with maps and captions that were added in by Dr. Willinsky to provide context. Featured cities include Lisbon, Tangier, Casablanca and Villa Daressada. Sadie is occassionally spotted sight-seeing, interacting with locals and purchasing wares from street vendors." Ontario Jewish Archives.


Snakes

Date produced: 1948

Filmmaker(s):

A. I. Willinsky

Description:

"Item is a film of Dr. Willinsky's trip to a snake farm in Miami, Florida. The last few minutes of the film switches to footage of a snake charmer likely taken by Dr. Willinsky in Morocco. Film is in the form of a travelogue with commentary provided by Dr. Willinsky." Ontario Jewish Archives.


Song After Sorrow

Date produced: 1939

Filmmaker(s):

Ray L. Garner

Virginia Garner

Description:

"Documentary: Illustrates plight of leprosy victims before and after the opening of the Bibanga Leper Camp by missionaries." National Archives.


Spanish Morocco

Date produced: 1950

Filmmaker(s):

A. I. Willinsky

Description:

"Item is a film of a trip Dr. Willinsky took to the Spanish Moroccan city of Tetuan with his wife, Sadie. In the form of a travelogue, footage of the sights along city streets, landmarks, markets and the local population are accompanied by music and Dr. Willinsky's commentary. Sadie is occassionally spotted sight-seeing." Ontario Jewish Archives.


Story of Bamba, The

Date produced: 1939

Filmmaker(s):

Ray L. Garner

Virginia Garner

Description:

"The Story of Bamba is a drama filmed in Africa by Ray L. Garner for the Harmon Foundation in New York. This reviewer calls the production a film drama advisedly, for, although it is made as a report of the medical work of a missionary group in Africa, the picture is, in itself, an entertaining photoplay. The boy, Bamba, is the nephew of the tribal witch doctor who cures sickness with his fetishes. Bamba is to become the medicine man's successor, but he falls ill with the fever and is deserted by the tribe when they hurriedly flee their village to rid themselves of a plague. Rescued and cured by the native representative of the missionary medical center, Bamba is sent to school so that he too, can cure in the white man's way. An adult, he returns to his own tribe, where he meets and finally overcomes the resistance of his uncle. Thus, the plot unfolds clearly and entertainingly, yet the story does not interfere with a complete exposition of the medical work of missionaries. Skillful handling of native actors is apparent in every scene, for there is scarcely an unconvincing piece of business in the whole film. Camera treatment is matter of fact but adequate." Movie Makers, Dec. 1939, 637.


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