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Art of Universal Winding, The

Date produced: 1943

Filmmaker(s):

Morton H. Read

Description:

"Morton Read's industrial picture, The Art of Universal Winding, serves a special purpose very convincingly. His client had difficulty in attracting girls to his factory, because the work of wire winding had, in the past, not gained social acceptance in many New England communities. Mr. Read's task was to show that wire winding is an important wartime occupation, that it is interesting, safe and pleasant and that women of superior types are to be found in it. The chief performer in the film is a fine looking woman of dignity and evident character who illustrates the work which must be learned by new employees. The movie is not only educational, as a true training film should be, but it adds its special message naturally and effectively." Movie Makers, Dec. 1943, 474.


Warriors of Another World

Date produced: 1942

Filmmaker(s):

Richard Cassell

Description:

"It is a strange and savage world indeed which Dr. Richard Cassell explores in his Warriors of Another World, a striking recording of nature's continuing and inexorable conflict. His warriors, among others, are the ant lion (with its simple but treacherous sand trap), the scorpion, the mantis, the black widow and the field spider. Into the life of each of these — and their unwary and often unarmed victims — Dr. Cassell has probed with his long focus lenses, to bring back reports of murder, sudden death and cannibalism among the insects. His technical handling of the specialized tools of his trade is beyond reproach, while his continuity treatments range the full gamut of motion picture story telling. Both micro and macrocinematography are used in the film's course, to develop well rounded sequences that are, incredibly, complete with medium shots, near shots, closeups and even reaction scenes made during the tiny but titanic battles. We see (in full frame closeup) the multiple lensed eye of a housefly, only to learn from immediate and striking imagery what such an eye might record — a housewife approaching with a fly swatter. Warriors of Another World is a distinguished contribution to educational film making." Movie Makers, Dec. 1943, 474.


Ten Pretty Girls

Date produced: 1942

Filmmaker(s):

Anchor O. Jensen

Description:

"Novel continuity, beautiful cinematography and a nosegay of feminine charms are the distinctive features of Ten Pretty Girls, produced by Anchor O. Jensen. This expert little drama, made on 8mm Kodachrome, is an excellent example of quality workmanship in that width. The opening scene shows a young man contemplating his address book. He folds a large piece of paper and cuts from it a string of ten dolls, which become the symbols of as many lovely young women. As each doll is torn from the group, a new sequence featuring one of the girls is introduced. A different flower, corsage or bouquet figures in the action as each of the girls is shown in some individual and flattering setting. At the conclusion, the young man has made his choice; he spurns the blondes and brunettes for the favors of a titian beauty." Movie Makers, Dec. 1943, 474.


Romance of the Hybrid Orchid

Date produced: 1943

Filmmaker(s):

A. M. Zinner

Description:

"A. M. Zinner has performed not only a labor of love in Romance of the Hybrid Orchid, but he has made an important contribution to the available information about orchid growing. Given the run of Shaw's Garden, the famous botanical park of St. Louis, he has traced the life of hybrid orchids from seed to full flowering, with especial study of the behind the scenes events in the hot beds and potting rooms. Outstanding is the section of the film devoted to the care and exact technique that must be used in handling seeds while they germinate. With this work of several years, Mr. Zinner takes his place in the ranks of significant amateur naturalists who have provided exhaustive records of some special field. In offering his carefully planned and detailed footage, Mr. Zinner also gives some very lovely flower pictures, including the rarest of the world's orchids. Beautiful camera work and expert sequencing mark the picture." Movie Makers, Dec. 1943, 474.


Pathétique

Date produced: 1943

Filmmaker(s):

Herman Bartel

Description:

"Herman Bartei has, in Pathetique, made another contribution in the special field which he shares with Walt Disney and Leopold Stokowski — that of setting music to film. In this process, the music is the absolute, to which the footage must conform. While Disney achieves his conformity with drawings, Bartei uses actual cinematography of natural scenes. Mr. Bartel's absolute in this instance is the first movement of Tschaikowsky's Sixth — or Pathetique — Symphony, which is played from start to finish on double turntables, while the film sets forth what its maker feels is an interpretation in motion pictures of the music. The footage consists of autumn scenes, whose subject matter and tempo are varied to agree with the musical expression. The success or failure of this type of effort must depend upon the universality of the conviction of unity between musical and scenic episodes. Mr. Bartei reaches several high spots, notably one in which swirling crows against an angry sky are in very real harmony with the musical statement. Other scenes of autumn mist are very apposite to Tschaikowsky's phrases. The synthesis as a whole is both convincing and emotionally exciting." Movie Makers, Dec. 1943, 474.


Paricutin

Date produced: 1943

Filmmaker(s):

Ralph E. Gray

Description:

"Paracutin, by Ralph E. Gray, is probably the most complete and accurate record of Mexico's new world wonder yet to be produced on 16mm. film, even possibly in the 35mm. medium. Mr. Gray, long one of Mexico's most devoted American friends, was on the scene soon after the eruption broke out in a peasant's cornfield, and he has made four further trips to record changes and progress in the volcano's life. His superbly filmed footage presents the dramatic subject from every available viewpoint — even to seemingly dangerous closeups of the fiery rim — but it has been edited and is presented in strictly accurate chronological order. Human interest scenes of the effect of the giant cauldron on native life are plentiful and appealing, even to a striking sequence of the heavy dust deposits along the streets of Uruapan, more than thirty miles from the eruption. Paracutin is today a dramatic study of beauty and power; it should prove in the future to be a unique and valuable scientific record." Movie Makers, Dec. 1943, 474.


Nantucket, A Chapter from Early America

Date produced: 1943

Filmmaker(s):

Russell T. Pansie

Description:

"In filming Nantucket, A Chapter from Early America, Russell T. Pansie chose a happy subject for Kodachrome — the weatherbeaten grays and pastel colors of the ancient buildings of Nantucket. Most color films are made with an effort to present colors as brilliantly as possible, but this picture is a delightful exception, and it is a notable example of the versatility of color film in the hands of a competent cameraman. In Nantucket, A Chapter from Early America, we see the orderly streets of the island, the historic buildings that date from the early Eighteenth Century, the mansions built by the prosperous sea captains of the Nineteenth Century and we glimpse the island's natural charm. But, in the brief footage that he wisely allowed himself, the cameraman has achieved more than an architectural study; he has reproduced the atmosphere of life as it was lived in the past." Movie Makers, Dec. 1943, 474.


Jewels of the Sea

Date produced: 1943

Filmmaker(s):

William W. Vincent

Description:

"You may have wandered idly along the seashore and picked up an attractive seashell, but, unless you are a conchologist, you will never know how far an interest in shells will carry you, until you have seen Jewels of the Sea, by W. W. Vincent, jr. This film is a story of collecting seashells. It tells, with freshness and enthusiasm, how shells are discovered on the shore, how they are cleaned and prepared for preservation and how they are studied. On the west coast of Florida, we see hunters searching for specimens ; we visit a shell shop and the home of a collector. The camera, plus color film, reveals the beauty of the specimens and presents intriguing mysteries, for some of the shells were built by mollusks that have never been seen alive. The source of their irridescent beauty is entirely unknown. Jewels of the Sea does not pretend to be an educational film about zoology, but it is informative as well as entertaining, and it is distinguished by flawless camera work." Movie Makers, Dec. 1943, 457, 474.


Lend Me Your Ear

Date produced: 1943

Filmmaker(s):

Erma Niedermeyer

Description:

"Lend Me Your Ear is an almost perfect synthesis of shrewd planning, impeccable camera work, smoothly integrated music and general, overall charm. It is gay, glamorous and in good taste. In it, Erma Niedermeyer has caught the lighthearted spirit of 'teen aged American youth. That she was amply aided by her own attractive son was her further good fortune. As the film opens, the Boy is discovered musing over that classic advertisement which guarantees to teach you piano in ten easy lessons. "You too can be the life of the party!" it clarions. The Boy answers the call, the lessons start arriving and the fun begins. There is the light "running gag" of the harried postman, continually overwhelmed by the Boy's enthusiasm as he delivers each new installment; there is the time the piano refuses to play, clogged up as it is by a basketball in its "innards"; there is the tousle headed imitation of Franz Liszt at the age of fourteen — and more. There is, in climax, the Boy's devastating triumph amid a bevy of admiring beauties, as he becomes in truth "the life of the party." Geared to these sequences — which are presented in swift pace and with unerring command of the camera — is a musical accompaniment as suave as the film itself. A single commercial recording provides a slight and recurring background theme. All the remaining score — from the first hesitant scales to the final rocking rendition of a jazz hit — is in the Boy's own playing, especially recorded by Mrs. Niedermeyer to fit her own picture. It is an ineffable and irresistible combination, this Lend Me Your Ear, warmly deserving of the high honor it has won." Movie Makers, Dec. 1943, 457.


Teeth and Good Health

Date produced: 1942

Filmmaker(s):

Morton H. Read

Description:

"Morton H. Read has made, in Teeth and Good Health, an effective study of the work accomplished by the Dental Clinic of the Public Schools of Springfield, Mass. This film should be of great interest to educators whose institutions offer a similar service to children of grade school age. The picture lucidly outlines the program followed by the teachers, nurses and doctors in the system set up by this school, to facilitate caring for the children's teeth. Charts and diagrams that warn the children of the danger of neglected teeth are shown, as well as excellent shots of the dentists at work. Thus, through familiarizing youngsters with the importance of dental care and its mechanics, the child is taught not to fear the dentist. A recalcitrant mother serves as a focal point for the detailed explanation of the advantages of the dental program in the school. The filming is marked by competent cinematography, logical sequence arrangement and simplification of detail." Movie Makers, Dec. 1942, 509-510.


Total Pages: 215