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Keeping in Touch

Date produced: 1939

Filmmaker(s):

T. W. Willard

Description:

"Keeping in Touch, planned to indicate how printer and ink maker alike must keep in touch with fundamental research which is revolutionizing the graphic arts, was produced by Willard Pictures for International Printing Ink, a division of Interchemical Corporation, in New York City. A complex technical subject, involving such problems as spectrophotography and the effective filming of many gleaming machines, the production has been handled smoothly and clearly. In a pictorial argument where accurate color renditions of many differing materials were of paramount importance to the client, Willard Pictures has given its customary first class account of technical ability. The development of the film is well paced, and the use of music and narrative intelligent." Movie Makers, Dec. 1939, 636-637.


Film Editing

Date produced: 1939

Filmmaker(s):

Kenneth F. Space

Description:

"Film Editing, an exposition of this topic, is a single subject in the series, You Can Make Good Movies, produced by the Harmon Foundation of New York and photographed by Kenneth F. Space. This film presents the successful use of a medium to explain its own working and is divided into two parts — first, the mechanical operations involved in editing and splicing and, second, the methods used to present simple cinematic ideas through cutting. The clear and well ordered presentation of this subject is noteworthy. The first part of the film is characterized by a number of excellent, unusually large closeups showing the operations of scraping the film, applying cement, splicing, etc. In one or two of these closeups, however, the significant action was partially obscured, as in the case of closeups showing the application of cement to a splice, where the cork at the end of the brush got in the way. In general, however, the presentation was very clear and well photographed. Other methods than those shown could have been employed to produce the same results, but, in an instructional film of this nature, it is taken for granted that only one method can be presented without confusion." Movie Makers, Dec. 1939, 636.


Complete Immediate Denture Technique for the General Practitioner, A

Date produced: 1939

Filmmaker(s):

James E. Bliss

Description:

"In A Complete Immediate Denture Technique for the General Practitioner, Dr. James E. Bliss offers a striking example of how skillfully motion picture technique may be adapted to a subject as highly specialized as dentistry. An intelligent and systematic scheme of varying camera positions serves to present detailed material in as effective a manner as possible. Unhampered by the conventional idea, that the camera should rarely be shifted from one viewpoint to another when making such a film, Dr. Bliss has approached the subject with a plan of shooting sequences just as if he were making a dramatic film. The whole scheme of shots is simply considerably closer than it would be in the case of an ordinary subject. The result gives a feeling of unity and assures one that he is not looking at a series of movie slides. The ultra closeups in color are among the finest that have ever been filmed and, because of excellent lighting and precise focus, they make an outstanding teaching film." Movie Makers, Dec. 1939, 636.


Staff of Life, The

Date produced: 1939

Filmmaker(s):

Jack L. Krapp

Description:

"Good organization of material and excellent photographic presentation of a familiar story make The Staff of Life, by Jack L. Krapp, an attractive and interesting film. Mr. Krapp has an eye for beauty in everyday subjects, and his progressive story of raising, harvesting and milling wheat leaves no detail uncovered in its searching, yet interesting story. Baking procedures are equally thoroughly covered, all in competent cinematography. For those who feel handicapped when working in 8mm., this film would be an inspiration, for certainly one is conscious of no limitation. A noteworthy feature is the clean cut handling of the titles." Movie Makers, Dec. 1939, 636.


Book of Ruth, The

Date produced: 1939

Filmmaker(s):

C. Manley DeBevoise

Description:

"In the best tradition of filming technique, a movie should be an independent story telling medium. It should not require explanation or demonstration to make its meaning clear. Yet, there is no reason why this cardinal principle should not be violated, if the variation from accepted technique serves an artistic purpose. The Book of Ruth, by G. Manley DeBevoise, involves a new departure from tradition, for the film itself is an illustration in motion of the Biblical story, rather than a complete dramatization of the story. The tale is told by a narrator in synchronism with the appearance of the scenes on the screen, and, without the narration, the movie would be incomprehensible. Yet the two form a perfect unit which resents a fuller interpretation of the story of Ruth than would be possible by any other means. Costuming and selection of properties for this film are excellent and accurate. A church group worked for months in research to avoid anachronisms. The result is a splendid religious teaching film. The narration is given in person, and music is carefully scored by double turntable." Movie Makers, Dec. 1939, 636.


Streets of Peace

Date produced: 1939

Filmmaker(s):

Lewis B. Sebring

Description:

"In Streets of Peace, Lewis B. Sebring, jr., presents a manifold accomplishment in film. Here is a record of the New York World's Fair 1939, but a record which, because of its selectivity, gives the impression of completeness in setting forth a single theme, although the material is both voluminous and varied. Here, also, is an interpretation of the epic idea behind the foreign participation in this great American exposition, the vision of peace, which has since been so rudely interrupted. Mr. Sebring takes his camera through the streets of peace, literally, and we see one after another of the foreign buildings and exhibits at the Fair; we also look at the different national celebrations in the Court of Peace. The visit of the King and Queen of England is recorded in considerable detail. After a scene of children of many lands uniting in a gathering in the Children's World, we find the pointed query as to what these youngsters will make of the "world of tomorrow," and the picture closes with distinguished shots of the United States Building, with its flag and the word "Peace," which appears on its façade. Mr. Sebring's titling is admirable, both in wording and in execution. His Kodachrome exposures have less good moments, but his camera handling is otherwise pleasing. Here is a workmanlike and finished recording of a great international event." Movie Makers, Dec. 1939, 635-636.


Peggy’s Cove [1939]

Date produced: 1939

Filmmaker(s):

Francis M. Hirst

Description:

"Francis M. Hirst's Peggy's Cove is 8mm. scenic cinematography of a very fine kind. This familiar movie subject for personal filmers is given added interest and beauty by Mr. Hirst's handling of it. He has not departed from the high standard set by Edward Bollinger in the first of the many Peggy's Coves to be offered for Ten Best. While Mr. Bollinger had the advantage of a larger frame size, Mr. Hirst had the added factor of color, and he makes the most of it, hurdling the problem of distant shots in 8mm. Kodachrome in gallant fashion. Here we have the sincere recording, by an artist with an instant eye for beauty, of a locale that will, for years to come, invite the attention of filmers who wish to match their art against a distinguished subject." Movie Makers, Dec. 1939, 635.


Ski Legs

Date produced: 1939

Filmmaker(s):

Robert M. Coles

Charles Coles

Description:

"In Ski Legs, the family filming team of Cinecoles has produced an able and amusing farce comedy on the perils of skiing for the novice. Spurred on by the waning love of his onetime sweetheart — newly devoted to the current ski champion — the hero risks life and limb on the snowy trails, to win out in the end through a series of adroitly conceived mishaps. The film is a pat illustration of the oft spoken truism that the best humor for amateur films is the humor of situation, not the "funny" acting of the actors. To Charles Coles goes the credit for crisp and competent photography, with Robert Coles responsible for the direction of a well developed plot and its genuinely amusing "gags." " Movie Makers, Dec. 1939, 635.


Out to Win

Date produced: 1939

Description:

"When movie makers turn to movie making itself as the subject of a picture, sometimes they are a little self conscious and heavy handed — more particularly if the approach is humorous. This fault, the Dallas (Texas) Cine Club has successfully avoided in Out to Win, an opus that displays the adventures of a new convert to filming. The hero of the tale observes that everybody has a movie camera and that he is out of things. So his trombone and the equipment of other hobbies go to the "hock shop" to finance the purchase of a new cine camera. His wife isn't particularly sympathetic to movie making, and here the real humor enters, for Mrs. Movie Maker is not antagonistic; she is just oblivious to the real importance of movies. She walks in on her husband when he is developing titles, she tramps through film clips when he is editing; but, when the movie maker receives an incredible sum for a newsreel scoop (well handled airplane wreck sequence) and, in consequence, gets a check that enables the pair to buy a new car, Mrs. Movie Maker's attitude changes. In the last scene, she is proudly using a camera. The actors are excellent: they do not overplay their roles, and so the film is really funny." Movie Makers, Dec. 1939, 634-635.


Jello Again

Date produced: 1939

Filmmaker(s):

Carl Anderson

Description:

"Jello Again is an entertaining film, produced entirely by animation, that stands by itself even when the special work necessary to produce it is discounted. This Kodachrome subject, filmed by Carl Anderson, is made entirely in stop motion with puppet actors, an exceedingly difficult job. The excellence of the handling of the puppets and accessory properties, together with the imaginative quality of the settings, makes the subject an outstanding one. Here and there throughout the film, there are certain indications of unevenness in exposure on the "over" side, but, because of the real achievement embodied in the film as a whole, this very slight flaw may well be overlooked. The models used in the action were most cleverly constructed and colored, and the variety of camera angles employed was especially appropriate to the subject from the point of view of presenting the material advantageously." Movie Makers, Dec. 1939, 634.


Total Pages: 207