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Snow White

Date produced: 1916

Filmmaker(s):

F. B. Richards

Description:

A theatrical-dance version of Snow White performed at the Blue Hill Country Club in coastal Maine.


Sweetheart Roland

Date produced: 1966

Filmmaker(s):

John M. Raymond

Description:

"Sweetheart Roland comes to us from Grimm's Fairy Tales and depicts a grandmother reading the story to a young child of perhaps three years while the latter imagines just what the tale would have been like in real life. This gives the producer sufficient latitude to act out the story with his characters much as the youngster might imagine it. Synched dialog of the actors with the narrator's voice is a clever innovation seldom seen on the amateur screen" PSA Journal, Sept. 1966, 34.


Little Red Riding Hood

Date produced: 1962

Filmmaker(s):

Paula Wolnez

George Wolnez

Description:

"A delightful filming of the nursery story in which mother, daughter, auntie, and the family collie do the parts. Instead of the usual home movies we so often see, the Wolnezs have captured the family on film in a story that will delight all who see it, young and old. This will be blown up to 16mm and included in the Package" PSA Journal, Oct. 1962, 34.


Snow White and The Seven Dwarfs

Date produced: 1960

Filmmaker(s):

Ervin R. Miller

Description:

"To film the story made famous by Walt Disney is a major assignment. Snow White, a pretty young miss, did her part exceedingly well. This is very important- she is with us for fifty-two minutes, and we are happy for our visit with her. The Seven Dwarfs are a collection of small fry and here the film had some of the problems of amateur actors. The picture is done to the sound track of Disney's Snow White. A story for young and old and, if we will look beyond some of the little things that could be better, a delightful bit of entertainment for all of us" PSA Journal, Nov. 1960, 40.


Goldilocks and the Three Bears

Date produced: 1951

Filmmaker(s):

Joseph Fischer

Description:

"Joseph Fischer's 'Goldilocks And The Three Bears' is an unusual amateur accomplishment in which the filmer and his associates staged the age old nursery tale in miniature, building all the sets, props and the marionette figures themselves. A drawback is the lack of sound narration or continuity titles." American Cinematographer, May. 1952, 224.


Proem

Date produced: 1949

Filmmaker(s):

Ralph W. Luce

Leonard W. Tregillus

Description:

" The imaginative experiments with animated clay figures begun last year in No Credit have, in this year's Proem, proved out as a suave and wholly integrated art form. The unique and wholly delightful work of Leonard Tregillus and Ralph Luce, jr., has here come handsomely of age — both technically and creatively. Proem, conceived as a preface to the theme of Carroll's Through the Looking Glass, is of far greater filmic stature than its already rented status permits it to be rated." Movie Makers, Dec. 1949, 470.


Magic City, The

Date produced: 1948

Filmmaker(s):

Virginia B. Rodarmor

Description:

"In The Magic City, Virginia Rodarmor shows a warm and winning appreciation of a child's love for fairy tales. After a delightful opening scene in which Mother pantomimes the end of a bedtime story to her three young ones, we see them being tucked away for the night. The film then pictures the children enacting, in a dream, the tale their mother has just related. A regrettable lack of steady camera support is offset by the sensitive unfolding of the story, keeping it unerringly on a level of pure fantasy. A delightful and characteristic conceit is the sequence in which the witch is transformed into a pure white cat — complete with miniature black mask and peaked hat. The role is played by the family pet with superb and feline aplomb. The Magic City is a rewarding adventure into the difficult realm of motion picture fantasy." Movie Makers, Dec. 1948, 495.


Christmas Nuts

Date produced: 1935

Filmmaker(s):

Howard Goodman

Paul Braun

Description:

"Christmas Nuts, presented with a sound on film recording on a separate 16mm. film, produced by Paul Braun and Howard Goodman, is not only an interior color picture of exceptional beauty and impeccable technical quality but is also one of the best puppet films thus far created. With a camera technique paralleling that of the latest theatrical, animated talkie cartoons, the story of a wolf "hijacking" Santa Claus and the consequent near calamity for the two squirrels is unfolded in a completely cinematic fashion. The camera moves freely from medium shot to closeup, the mechanics of the sets are not obstrusive and the puppets move with agility and grace. The sets, which were designed and constructed with great care, are very handsome and exquisitely finished so that no imperfections are revealed in the enlarged picture of them on the screen. The sets, in combination with the colored lights used in part to illuminate them, embody the producers' theory of "created color." That is, no attempt is made to simulate nature, but rather to produce pleasing, vivid color combinations, as in the illustrations of a child's story book. A cleverly compiled dialog, song and music accompaniment has been synchronized with the picture, although recorded, at present, on a separate film." Movie Makers, Dec. 1935, 534.