E-mail us: amdb@ucalgary.ca

Unexpected, The

Date produced: 1948

Filmmaker(s):

Ernest H. Kremer

Description:

"The Unexpected, by Ernest H. Kremer, is that rara avis of the amateur movie world, a perfectly produced and universally entertaining family film. It is no secret, surely, that taking pictures of one's family outranks all other reasons prompting a home filmer to buy his camera. It is an equally open secret that the results, generally, are those that only a mother could love. Judged impersonally and by even the simplest movie standards, the technique is sloppy, camera treatment dull and continuity non-existent. But now, with The Unexpected, family film making takes on new stature and its apostles may speak with new pride. The picture tells a simple tale: A man arrives home and finds a note from his wife. Unexpectedly, she writes, she has been called to the city, but there is food in the icebox, et cetera, etc. Later that evening, after a suavely developed interlude of husbandly miming, the wife returns and announces that she expects a baby. The rest of the rewardingly short reel records early activities in the life of the infant, capped by a swift and comic climax. A simple tale, but superbly told. Mr. Kremer's technical skill, developed through years of competent 8mm. work, is more than a match for this, his first 16mm. production. Perhaps most outstanding among the picture's many fine points is its admirable economy of footage. Running a scant 325 feet of film, it has a sense of pace regrettably rare in amateur movies. Mr. Kremer, for example, recognizes the lap dissolve as a spatial transition, not a specious ornament — and he uses it as such with telling effect. His editing is crisp, his camera treatment incisive and his continuity planned and purposeful. The Unexpected, in proving that excellence can join hands with the hearthside, should be a ringing challenge to all family filmers." Movie Makers, Dec. 1948, 474-475.


Traveler, The

Date produced: 1933

Filmmaker(s):

John Earl

Description:

"This was a very delightful 16mm subject that carried much entertainment value in addition to its good photographic quality." American Cinematographer, Dec. 1934, 377


Reconstruction of Nose

Date produced: 1933

Filmmaker(s):

Abraham Schur

Description:

"This picture was made with indoor lighting and showed a very consistent photography." American Cinematographer, Dec. 1934, 377.


Story of Water, The

Date produced: 1933

Filmmaker(s):

Frank H. Demarest

Description:

"This picture was a finely photographed record of water from the ocean to the clouds and back to the ocean again through its various stages. His photography rated high." American Cinematographer, Dec. 1934, 377.

"The one reel film, Water, is a pleasant blending of plan and montage. In it, Howard Demarest, ACL, has traced what may be termed the life cycle of water — from its restless abundance in the great oceans, its radiant journey to banking clouds, the return in rainfall, until, through the coursing of streams and rivers, it blends once more in the sea. Parts of this great, natural continuity Mr. Demarest had on film before the present picture was definitely conceived. Other parts he made following the conception, sometimes to fill it out, again to improve it with retakes. In all these deftly integrated sequences his photography is consistently crisp, sparkling and steady. In many of the scenic views it approaches perfection in beauty of composition and lighting. Attractive and well worded titles round out a piece of work that is definitely superior." Movie Makers, Dec. 1933, 522.


October

Date produced: 1933

Filmmaker(s):

Roanna Hill

Description:

"This picture was a special delight as Miss Hill had concentrated upon pastel colors as she found them in the woods and fields. Also she brought the human element into her picture very gracefully and entertainingly." American Cinematographer, Dec. 1934, 377.


Brook, The

Date produced: 1933

Filmmaker(s):

James A. Sherlock

Description:

"It was based on Tennyson's poem and the scenes were made to fit the poem. This was very evident from the smoothness of the continuity. His photography secured a very high marking." American Cinematographer, Dec. 1934, 376.


Mischief

Date produced: 1933

Filmmaker(s):

Van Dee Sickler

Description:

"Under the classification of Home Movie, Van Dee Sickler of Los Angeles was awarded the $50.00 prize for his picture 'Mishcief,' a 16 mm subject in 200 feet. The continuity is evolved around his wife, a Scotch terrier, a cat and a bird. The continuity, titles and photography of this picture were very good." American Cinematographer, Dec. 1934, 376.


Tender Friendship

Date produced: 1933

Filmmaker(s):

Tatsuichi Okamoto

Description:

"Okamoto's heroine was a Japanese girl making a doll as a birthday present for a friend. Pictorial values, backgrounds of the Japanese countryside in spring, and the delicate grain which Cinematographer Okamoto had achieved gave his film distinction." American Cinematographer, Feb. 1935, 78.

"'Tender Friendship,' in 150 feet of 8mm film, was sensational from the photographic standpoint. Its sheer beauty, its poetic rhythm both in story and photography, made it one of the outstanding pictures of the contest" American Cinematographer, Dec. 1934, 365.


New Horizon

Date produced: 1933

Filmmaker(s):

Randolph B. Clardy

Description:

"In New Horizon, Cinematographer Clardy presented the life of a farm girl at a moment of crisis. One reel, almost without titles, tells the story of her efforts to marry the man she loves in spite of her father's opposition which keeps her chained to the farm." American Cinematographer, Feb. 1935, 78.

"Clardy was the winner last year of the gold medal for scenario and photography. Last year Clardy's picture was based on a western theme, while this year his scenario, although set in its greater part in the outdoors had several indoor shots. However, most to be admired was the way in which he handled his production both from composition and directorial standpoint. There were only three people in his cast with the girl assuming the major role. His sense of dramatic values, and especially his fine feeling for the proper tempo brought forth unstinted praise from the judges." American Cinematographer, Dec. 1934, 365


Black Door, The

Date produced: 1931

Filmmaker(s):

Hal Morey

Description:

"Everyone is familiar with the fine work turned out by the Greenbrier Amateur Movie Club of White Sulphur Springs, W. Va. This club was given the fourth prize for their production "The Black Door," which has been honored in other contests conducted both here and abroad. This organization shows a fine sense of production values and an insight into what is required to build the proper suspense in motion picture entertainment." American Cinematographer, Dec. 1932, 7


Total Pages: 211