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Roundabout to Maybee

Date produced: 1970

Filmmaker(s):

Charles E. Phillips

Description:

"Film is mostly animated featuring toy cars and trucks on paper roads with paper trees. The highlights of the film are a roundabout, which is a type of circular intersection and signs which have more than one meaning. The film also includes a human man and woman who seem to be driving one of the cars" Archives of Ontario.


[Edwards Gardens]

Date produced: 1964

Description:

"Film features trees and leaves, ducks, water, a statue, 2 women wearing coats, a bridge and some house-like structures. The garden was filmed in the spring/summer and fall" Archives of Ontario.


Long May We Cherish

Date produced:

Filmmaker(s):

Tommy Walker

Description:

This film was produced at some time in the 1950s.


There Was a Tramp

Date produced: 1967

Description:

"There Was a Tramp has, at first fade-in, a similarity to other tramp pictures, but the life breathed into the main character is what brings this film out of the ordinary and sets it apart from the rest. The story line becomes almost secondary to the acting of the tramp and his portrayal" PSA Journal, Aug. 1967, 36.


How Pine Trees Reproduce

Date produced: 1964

Filmmaker(s):

William M. Harlow

Description:

"How Pine Trees Reproduce has some exciting scenes and some little known information on a subject few of us know much about. It could be a dull film, but Dr. Harlow's skill with camera and scissors has produced a most informative result" PSA Journal, Sept. 1964, 51.


Sugar Maple, The

Date produced: 1962

Filmmaker(s):

Helen Webb-Smith

Description:

"As the snow begins to melt, the sugar maple begins to raise some of the water thru its roots. The rising water picks up a small amount of sugar to feed the tree in its new growth. We have learned how to rob the tree of some of this sweet water which we call sap. We boil off the excess water, leaving a syrup-maple syrup. The picture presents the story of gathering the sap and the reduction to syrup. A sweet subject and nicely handled" PSA Journal, Oct. 1962, 36.


Trees That Grow in Brooklyn

Date produced: 1946

Filmmaker(s):

Leo J. Heffernan

Description:

"It is spring in Brooklyn, and Leo J. Heffernan has found a multitude of trees there. He opens the film with a sombre shot of New York's waterfront and skyline, to indicate the tense activity of a large city. A title suggests that those who live in the midst of this turmoil can find solace not far away. The film proceeds to the bounteous display of flowering trees in a large public park. Glowing shots of heavily laden branches against blue sky are interspersed with scenes of Sunday strollers wandering through shaded walks and falling petals. Mr. Heffernan has used to good effect his fine technical skill, and his color transitions between scenes are smoothly accomplished. Trees That Grow in Brooklyn is accompanied by a rhymed narrative written especially for the film by Mr. Heffernan." Movie Makers, Dec. 1946, 489.


September Peace

Date produced: 1943

Filmmaker(s):

Robert P. Kehoe

Description:

"September Peace, Robert P. Kehoe will tell you, is a film which not only made itself but named itself. It is, patently, a product of this world at war, the unconscious reaction of a sensitive spirit too long abraded by the rough edges of conflict. In it, Mr. Kehoe has found again the lyric loveliness of field and flower, the beneficent sturdiness of great trees, the warmth and beauty of the slanting sunlight. Unusually effective scoring plays its part in creating this moving attestation to the joys of peace." Movie Makers, Dec. 1943, 478.


Awakening

Date produced: 1942

Filmmaker(s):

Herman Bartel

Description:

"Most movie makers look about for suitable music for a picture, only after it has been completed. Herman Bartel, who produced Awakening, scores his films just the other way around. He listens to a composition that he likes until he thinks of picture material that will express its mood. Since Mr. Barters appreciation and selection of music are above reproach and since his ability to take a camera and a roll of film and make them sing is well known, we can only add that this is his finest film to date. It is very difficult to explain a Bartel picture. You can say that the subjects are flowers, trees, animals and the other common manifestations of nature, but what you must see to believe is that they have never been filmed in quite his way before. Mr. Bartel does not use parts of records and change from one to another with abrupt shifts in themes. Instead, he uses each record in full. In this film, the blend of picture and music is so matched that, in some scenes, reeds and bushes sway to the rhythm of the music. Needless to say, the camera work in this picture is superb. Other color films may be exposed as well, but they will never be exposed better because here is more than perfect exposure and lighting. Mr. Bartel has taken what existed and has made it say what he wanted it to say through skillful control of the devices at hand." Movie Makers, Dec. 1942, 489, 506.


Blossom Forth the Fruit

Date produced: 1941

Filmmaker(s):

William R. Hutchinson

Description:

"Blossom Forth the Fruit is a straightforward, well made, carefully planned and well exposed instructional film, which tells how to care for apple trees and their fruit in all stages of growth. Its maker, William R. Hutchinson, has a thorough knowledge of apple growing, and he also had the collaboration of specialists from Cornell University and the Farm Bureau. The clear presentation of all the phases of treatment that are necessary to insure the growth of fine fruit is noteworthy. From the technical point of view, microscopic color studies of insects, parasites and blights furnish excellent examples of ultra closeup technique. Methods of spraying and other protective treatment of the fruit are shown in clearly presented detail. Because of its clear presentation and uniformly high technical quality, this film is worthy of the highest commendation." Movie Makers, Dec. 1941, 564-565.


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