E-mail us: amdb@ucalgary.ca

Hodge Podge

Date produced: 1930

Description:

"Film is made up of a variety of short segments. Included is clip of a man fishing in an old mill stream, a New Year's Eve party, people toboganning and skiing, a time lapse of a cigarette burning, the Toronto skyline, and Niagara Falls" Archives of Ontario.


Solanus

Date produced: 1962

Filmmaker(s):

Ron Bennett

Description:

"Garden shots, including time lapse shots of flowers opening, and a 1962 parade in Sidney or Victoria" British Columbia Archives.


Floral Capers

Date produced: 1960

Filmmaker(s):

John W. Ruddell

Description:

"We remember Jack's Prelude to Spring a few years ago in which he dealt with time lapse photography. In Floral Capers he introduces the equipment he uses in time lapse photography and how he does it in one easy lesson. We watch flowers go through the opening cycle, vines racing up a pole, grasses, plants, and flowers racing ahead in their growth, split frame emphasizes the stimulation of light on the growth of plants. We watch many interesting events in the life of plants, and some amusing ones" PSA Journal, Nov. 1960, 40.


Motion

Date produced: 1946

Filmmaker(s):

Henry E. Hird

Description:

"Henry E. Hird, whose suavity and expertness as a movie maker increase each year, has chosen in his present offering to illustrate one of the cine film's most interesting capacities — its power to analyze motion. Introducing his footage with a lead title assembly finely accomplished with double exposure on moving backgrounds, Mr. Hird has observed and recorded with cinematic sureness such things as what happens when cream is poured into a cup of coffee and is filmed in such manner that the action is greatly slowed down for careful analysis. We watch the mechanics of flying seagulls, in landings and takeoffs. We look at the manner in which crystals are formed from chemical combinations, as well as at opening flowers, by time lapse filming. Smoke rings are shown and there are fine examples of the familiar dives caught in slow motion. Mr. Hird's picture compares favorably with the best slow motion studies of the professional screen, and it presents a number of fresh subjects." Movie Makers, Dec. 1946, 471, 486.


Heavens Declare the Glory of God, The

Date produced: 1944

Filmmaker(s):

S. G. Lutz

Description:

"With the use of a time lapse device, S. G. Lutz has made, in The Heavens Declare the Glory of God, a highly competent record of clouds in motion. Although the subject, treated in a different manner, might easily become too static actually to constitute a true movie. Mr. Lutz has achieved a sure continuity and a sense of artistry that is unusual. In many instances, the film presents sequences of such an unusual kind as to be highly exciting and almost awe inspiring. Speeding the motion of the clouds creates, from the commonplace, a sense of eeriness and weird beauty. In many of the storm sequences, the motion is so greatly dramatized as to impart a nearly terrifying sense of impending disaster." Movie Makers, Dec. 1944, 496.


Revelation

Date produced: 1942

Filmmaker(s):

Hans J. Theiler

Description:

"Revelation indeed reveals the slow, but intense, life of flowers as they unfold. Hans J. Theiler, who built a special mechanism for the purpose, has made time lapse studies of blooms in their determined efforts to find sunlight. Other flowers lose as well as open. The time lapse sequences are preceded by closeup footage of various blooms impeccably filmed. In the chief section of the picture, Mr. Theiler has caught very dextrously the unusual and almost terrifying performances of plants as they carry on their exceedingly active careers. The time lapses are exceptionally smooth." Movie Makers, Dec. 1944, 496.


These Bloomin’ Plants

Date produced: 1936

Filmmaker(s):

Eugene L. Ritzman

Description:

"These Bloomin' Plants, by Eugene L. Ritzmann, has been given Honorable Mention because of the striking technical tour de force which it represents. In it, Mr. Ritzmann has pictured, by means of a camera controlled by a mechanism of his own design and construction, the actual blossoming of some half dozen or more flowers. Through this device of time condensation, buds are seen bursting open before one's eyes, often in cascades of beauty which vividly suggest the magic of colored fireworks against a night sky. The technical management of this difficult and esoteric phase of photography was almost without flaw. In the opinion of the judges, however, Mr. Ritzmann failed to do full justice to his material, both in his editing and in his title treatment." Movie Makers, Dec. 1936, 551.


Commercial Production of Yeast, The

Date produced: 1935

Filmmaker(s):

William Schanzenbach

Description:

"A combination of time lapse cinemicrography and shooting huge factory interiors presented William Schanzenbach, ACL, with the gamut of technical difficulties in the photography of the four reel picture, The Commercial Production of Yeast. The interior shots of huge tanks and other machinery were not only adequately exposed but also were shot from attractive angles without extreme consciousness of camera angles. The laboratory sequences, in which time lapse technique was combined with work at the microscope to show the growth of yeast over a period of time, were well handled. Careful planning and clear titles add to the virtues of this exceptional industrial film." Movie Makers, Dec. 1935, 551.