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Calming the Patient Undergoing Cataract Surgery

Date produced: 1969

Filmmaker(s):

Leonard Grumley


Reconstruction of Nose

Date produced: 1933

Filmmaker(s):

Abraham Shur

Description:

"This picture was made with indoor lighting and showed a very consistent photography." American Cinematographer, Dec. 1934, 377.


Repair of an Indirect Inguinal Hernia

Date produced: 1946

Filmmaker(s):

Vincent Vermooten

Description:

"Extreme clarity and freedom from the shadows frequently encountered in medical films mark the technical details of the surgery shown in Dr. Vincent Vermooten's Repair of an Indirect Inguinal Hernia. Dr. Vermooten was, from the beginning, acutely conscious of the problems involved in bringing the proper light sources to bear upon a complex operation in which every bit of motion possesses great significance. To make certain of a steady and complete lighting scheme, he constructed a special platform above the operating table. Floodlights, closely bunched about the platform, left no possibility of inadequately lighted areas. The result is a record of an operation, masterfully pointed up by lighting, which should prove invaluable for instructional purposes." Movie Makers, Dec. 1946, 488.


Decomposition and Extraction of a Breech

Date produced: 1943

Filmmaker(s):

Robert Mallory

Description:

"Dr. Robert Mallory, III, offers another of his brilliant surgical movies. This very able filmer, who has brought his hobby to the service of his profession, studies the course of a childbirth in which grave complications are found. The operation is recorded very intelligently, and to the enforced continuity that the event itself makes necessary are brought closeups and varying camera positions, wherever these are possible. The value of this type of cinematography to surgeons who work alone in small communities is incalculable. When it exists at all, it is highly serviceable; when it is as well done as Dr. Mallory has done it, it is a very direct contribution to the art of healing. Dr. Mallory, in this film, makes a very clarifying use of a model, to show the misplacement of the child and some of the delivery technique, thus giving information that the camera could not otherwise have presented." Movie Makers, Dec. 1943, 477.


Retinal Detachment Operation

Date produced: 1942

Filmmaker(s):

Robert Mallory

Description:

"We have seen many medical and surgical films made by Dr. Robert Mallory, III, and most of them have been excellent. This one, however, a picturization of an extremely delicate operation on the eye, surpasses them all. It is a suave and exact record of the complete operation, featuring splendid full frame closeups of the eyeball. The exposure and filming technique are flawless except for one or two scenes in slightly soft focus. We are well aware of the difficulties encountered in making a film of this kind, and we feel that Dr. Mallory has scored a distinct triumph here. He is an exceptionally neat worker, and the entire film shows the effects of care in production and editing. Movie makers who have aspirations to become filmers of medical or surgical material could well take this film for a pattern." Movie Makers, Dec. 1942, 508.


Ackley Lower Impression Technic, The

Date produced: 1941

Filmmaker(s):

Harry Coleman

Description:

"The term, "perfect," is not one to be given lightly, but The Ackley Lower Impression Technic, a dental study, earns such comment, because there is no other word that fits. Harry Coleman, the producer, here shows a complete mastery of the camera. The film, of greatest interest to dental technicians, carries brief, double exposed titles that make each progressive step thoroughly clear to those versed in the phraseology. The titles appear at the proper time, superimposed upon the scene but out of the field of action, thus serving as a visual commentary. To anybody who is interested in dental filming, this movie might well serve as a model of a technical film, for it features extreme closeups, work in areas of the mouth difficult to film and a lighting technique indicative of real study and much experience. The exposure, especially important in showing the slight variations of color in parts of the mouth, is unusually accurate. Rarely does one see so satisfying an accomplishment in films of this specialized type." Movie Makers, Dec. 1941, 564.


Technique and Principles of Spinal Anaesthesia with Nupercaine, The

Date produced: 1939

Filmmaker(s):

Leslie P. Thatcher

Description:

"Imagine, if you can, a subject which would be harder to present in motion pictures than the effects of a spinal anaesthetic. This is the problem that Leslie P. Thatcher solved so ably in his Technique and Principles of Spinal Anaesthesia with Nupercaine. Because most of the action takes place within the body, it was necessary to do some real thinking before a suitable motion picture presentation could be worked out. For example, the action of the fluid as it floats in the spinal canal was shown dramatically and effectively by floating some of the drug in a solution in a slowly tilting glass phial. A considerable use of X-rays served to show clearly just how the hypodermic needle should be handled, while well photographed diagrams and models aid the film's clarity. Operative scenes represent the best technique, and the action clearly demonstrates the qualities of Nupercaine as an anaesthetic. The picture is a study in straightforward exposition and, as such, it should serve its sponsors admirably. It is to be noted that Mr. Thatcher showed admirable restraint in his brief shots of operations. While sufficient for the medical man, they are not too long or gruesome for a lay audience." Movie Makers, Dec. 1939, 633-634.


Keratoplasty

Date produced: 1935

Filmmaker(s):

Henry M. Lester

Description:

"Keratoplasty, by Henry M. Lester, ACL, is a beautifully perfect record of the operation of a corneal transplant for leucomateous eyes, filmed entirely in Kodachrome. The operation is performed by Dr. Ramon Castroviejo, a rabbit being the subject. Aside from the fact that this clearly executed film records an important and extraordinarily difficult operation in this field, it is notable for its brilliant photographic technique in handling the ultra closeup. In much of the footage, the eye itself practically fills the frame and, in this limited field of action, Mr. Lester has successfully shown every delicate bit of operative technique that is involved in this extremely sensitive surgical procedure. The area is so lighted that no shadows are cast to obscure detail, and the amazing rendition' of the delicate bit of transplanted tissue, the suturing and the various solutions employed, all in full color, is a genuine tribute to Mr. Lester's mastery of the Kodachrome process." Movie Makers, Dec. 1935, 550.


Thyroidectomy

Date produced: 1934

Filmmaker(s):

Henry M. Lester

Description:

"In Thyroidectomy, Henry M. Lester, ACL, has combined all the essentials of the perfect medical film. The delicate color gradations of tissues that mean much to the surgeon are clearly evident, due to excellent exposure, lighting and suitable film stock. Thorough presentation of the operating technique is given by means of suitable telephoto lenses and properly placing the camera in relation to the surgical field. An unusual feature of this particular operation is the large number of instruments which necessarily must remain in the field most of the time, creating a difficult problem for the photographer in that the many shining surfaces tend to produce undesirable reflections. However, Mr. Lester has solved this problem to perfection. The film is a result of the combination of highly specialized skill, equipment designed for the purpose and an exact knowledge of the requirements for the perfect surgical film." Movie Makers, Dec. 1934, 534.


Surgical Eradication of Pyorrhea

Date produced: 1933

Filmmaker(s):

S. H. McAfee

Description:

"In Surgical Eradication of Pyorrhea, Dr. S. H. McAfee, ACL, made use of a very fine closeup technique and, in presenting the preliminary clinical information, plaster models played an important part. The work was shown step by step so that certain points could be watched more closely later on. The very difficult problem of lighting oral surgery for good photography was well handled and the resulting exposure and definition were eminently satisfactory." Movie Makers, Dec. 1933, 524.


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