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[Amateur Cinema League in Toronto]

Date produced: 1942

Filmmaker(s):

Narcisse Pelletier

Description:

The title card reads: an amateur movie reel in kodachrome. Footage includes: S. Hurok Ballet Theater : "La fille mal gardée" (excerpts); Folk Dance Demonstrations by Ukrainians; Chinese Stage Dragon Dance for Red Cross; Eaton's Santa Claus Parade (no date); A Bit of the Toronto Skating Carnival; and An Abrupt Change to Ballet on a Stage in Toronto. Library and Archives Canada


Philadelphia Story

Date produced: 1951

Filmmaker(s):

Samuel Fass

Description:

"Sam Fass, having captured some remarkable footage of the Ice Follies in 16mm Kodachrome, set about to weave these shots into an interesting continuity with a logical story line. The director of the ice show summons to his office two likely prospects for one of his ice numbers. When the young women arrive, he projects 16mm movies of his show in order to demonstrate the numbers in which he wishes the girls to take part. When the film ends, the girls agree to join the show and sign contracts -a simple story thread on which the shots of the Ice Follies were deftly strung. The camera work on the Follies numbers is just about tops. Exposure is all anyone could ask for and each number is carefully chronicled and later edited in a slick manner that gives the illusion it all was carefully planned production." American Cinematographer, May. 1952, 222


Ice Follies 1947

Date produced: 1947

Filmmaker(s):

Oscar H. Horovitz

Description:

"Filming indoor spectacles is difficult, but it is made doubly so when the staging, actors and lighting facilities are in a constant state of flux. Yet Oscar H. Horovitz, in his Ice Follies 1947, has solved these problems with technical perfection. Points of filming vantage are carefully chosen, from which sequences of the major acts and personalities are imaginatively recorded. An intelligent use of varying focal length lenses contributes the near shots and closeups so necessary to a well rounded study of this kind. Mr. Horovitz more than maintains his position as one of the master craftsmen in his chosen field." Movie Makers, Dec. 1947, 538.