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And So to Edinburgh

Date produced: 1937

Filmmaker(s):

Alexander Black

Description:

"Kodachrome travelogue, photographed from 1935-1937, of Alexander Black's ancestral sites in Edinburgh, Scotland, and his return home to New York City, including six shots of the recently constructed Empire State Building at different times of day and night." UC Berkeley Library.


Camera Makes Whoopee

Date produced: 1936

Filmmaker(s):

Norman McLaren

Violet Anderson

William J. MacLean

Description:

"The Annual Fancy Dress Ball at Glasgow School of Art: 'Something New Under the Sun'. Includes two ballets, 'Hungarian' and 'Machine Age' and animated sequences." National Library of Scotland Moving Image Archive.


Seven Till Five

Date produced: 1933

Filmmaker(s):

Norman McLaren

William J. MacLean

Description:

"Filmed by Norman McLaren and Willie J. MacLean, [Seven Till Five] shows a day in the life of the Glasgow School of Art." National Library of Scotland Moving Image Archive.


Jeanette

Date produced: 1968

Filmmaker(s):

Rex Palmer

Description:

"Jeanette from Scotland won the Scenario Award for a story with a very touching twist at the end. Not much can be written as to its content without giving away the story and thus spoiling it for you when you see it. Rex Palmer did this one in black-and-white (only two other films in the Ten Best were not in color), with a deft handling of the story that tends to mislead you right up to the very end. It easily won as Best Foreign Film in this year's competition" PSA Journal, Oct. 1968, 48.


Money to Burn

Date produced: 1967

Filmmaker(s):

Ian F. Brock

Description:

"Money to Burn, believe it or not, comes from Scotland, where, if you can believe it, they burn money. But not until it is worn out and counted by a series of bank tellers. Then it goes up in smoke in this well-put together documentary" PSA Journal, Aug. 1967, 37.


Caledonian Chronicle

Date produced: 1949

Filmmaker(s):

Esther S. Cooke

Description:

"Esther Cooke showed intelligence and imagination in organizing the material of this travel study of Scotland, so that even the least observant should get from it a truly representative feeling of that doughty land. Well written titles serve as titles should, to infuse in the film pertinent data not shown in the scenes; technically, a less fussy style of title lettering would have been an improvement. Mrs. Cooke's slight camera unsteadiness in scenes of the King and Queen of England at the Scottish festival was understandable, for undoubtedly tripods were barred from that event. There were, however, a few other uneven shots that seemed to us questionable in value. Restrained use of bagpipe recordings highlight a generally effective musical score." Movie Makers, Dec. 1949, 469.