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Jícama [Jicama]

Date produced: 1970

Filmmaker(s):

Sergio Díaz Zubieta

O. Santos

Description:

"La película realizaba un montaje lúdico al yuxtaponer los mensajes políticos oficiales escritos en las bardas de la ciudad con imágenes o textos que los ironizaban o alteraban su sentido. El título viene de un juego de palabras con el fraseo de las sílabas "Mé-xi-co" / jí-ca-ma", que solían usarse entonces como porra en los partidos de fútbol de la selección nacional" (Vázquez Mantecón, 2012).

"The movie had a playful montage by juxtaposing official political messages written in walls around the city with images or text that ironized them or altered their meaning. The title comes from a word game that played with the phrasing of the syllables "Me-xi-co / ji-ca-ma", a popular chant during the national team soccer games of the time" (Vázquez Mantecón, 2012).


Eureka

Date produced: 1974

Filmmaker(s):

Nicolás Echevarría

Description:

"Primer súper 8 de Nicolás Echevarría, quien ya había realizado un trabajo experimental en 16 milímetros y veía en los superocheros una suerte de "comunidad de marginados" con la que se sentía a gusto, mostraba sobre el fondo de una pieza de Ravel las poses de un contorsionista que buscaba la autosatisfacción en un decorado que asocia la noción burguesa de confort al erotismo" (Vázquez Mantecón 2012)

"First super 8 film of Nicolás Echevarría, who had already filmed and experimental piece in 16 mm and saw in the supereighters a sort of "outcasts' community" that he identified himself with, it showed with the background of a Ravel musical piece the poses of a male contortionist looking for self-satisfaction in a setting that associates the notion of the bourgeoisie to the comfort of eroticism"


Chuchulucos y arrumacos para burgueses [Knick-knacks and cuddles for the bourgeois]

Date produced: 1974

Filmmaker(s):

Rafael Montero

Description:

"Una cinta cargada de referencias a Jean-Luc Godard (Los Carabineros, 1963) pero sobre todo concentrada en la crítica mordaz al radicalismo de izquierda. Una vez más Marco Antonio Madrid hace el papel de protagonista, un joven de pelo largo, pantalón de mezclilla y saco, que se dedica a ligar en los cafés de la Zona Rosa adoctrinando a las mujeres. Lee a Marx después de hacer el amor, y se junta con sus amigos para brindar por "la muerte de la intelectualidad burguesa". Montero utiliza intertítulos como recurso irónico, una suerte de narrador externo que interpela la historia: "¿Qué es la intelectualidad burguesa?". La lucha revolucionaria del joven y sus amigos está teñida de sentido del humor. En una secuencia que recuerda mucho a Los Carabineros, suben al techo de una fábrica para iniciar la lucha armada (...) Por último un cartel proporciona una última burla: "Y si el sol es burgués detendremos al sol" " (Vázquez Mantecón, 2012).

"A film loaded with references to Jean-Luc Godard (The Carabineers, 1963), but above all focused on biting criticism to the radical left. Once again Marco Antonio Madrid plays the role of the lead character, a young man with long hair, jeans and coat, that dedicates his time to hook up in the coffee shops of the Zona Rosa indoctrinating women. He reads Marx after making love and he gets together with his friends to toast for the "death of the bourgeois intellectuality". Montero uses intertitles as a resource for irony, a sort of outside narrator that interpellates the story: "What is bourgeois intellectuality?". The revolutionary fight of the young man and his friends is filled with a sense of humor. In a sequence that reminds us of The Carabineers, they go to the rooftop of a factory to begin the armed fight. (...) Finally a sign shows one last derision "And if the sun is bourgeois, we will stop the sun" " (Vázquez Mantecón, 2012).


Tattooed Lady, The

Date produced: 1996

Filmmaker(s):

Sidney N. Laverents

Description:

Experimental film showing Sid Laverents performing as a drunken stand-up comedian. The film includes a laugh track and footage inserts of comedy club audiences.


Hell Unltd.

Date produced: 1936

Filmmaker(s):

Norman McLaren

Helen Biggar

Description:

"Norman McLaren and Helen Biggar’s urgent work of animated agit-prop utilises a mixture of film forms (from found footage to title cards and staged action) stitched together with rapid editing to create an incisive and disorienting polemic against government armament spending. Made in 1936 as fascism was on the rise throughout Europe, the film was the result of collaboration between animator McLaren and sculptor Biggar, made during their tenure at the Glasgow School of Art. The idea was to use a rapid succession of violent images to jolt the viewer into demonstrative action against a new war, decades before such Brechtian techniques were employed by artists like Jean-Luc Godard. The result is one of the most striking and memorable of all animated political films" British Film Institute.


March of TV

Date produced: 1953

Filmmaker(s):

Charles E. Coleman

Description:

"We had thought satire, especially in films, was a lamented art of the past. Thus it is a pleasure to report that it is back again with a vengeance in March of TV. Following both the visual and narrative patterns originated by the now-familiar March of Time series, Charles E. Coleman has created an uproarious satire on television and the inroads it has made into the American home. Both subtle and devastating by turns, the film leaves no aspect of this electronic marvel unscathed. On the technical side, all departments have been capably handled, with the crisp direction and portentous narration being, perhaps, the most notable. The acting is assured and natural, remaining always within the farcical framework of the satire. Whether you like, dislike or simply ignore the subject which this shortie so sparklingly derides, March of TV is unreservedly guaranteed to keep you in stitches." Movie Makers, Dec. 1953, 332.


Switch in Time, A

Date produced: 1953

Description:

"A high-pressure advertising agency, rivalry within the firm, a switch of entries in a beauty contest and the effects thereof — these are the story ingredients out of which the Los Angeles 8mm. Club has fashioned an outstanding club film. Competent in all phases of movie production, from the smart opening titles to the corny romantics at the end, A Switch in Time is a hilarious cine satire of the foibles of big-time advertising. Seldom does a film of this type demonstrate so capably — in story, photography, direction, acting, editing and sound — the combined abilities of a group of enthusiastic movie makers." Movie Makers, Dec. 1953, 319-320.


Solar Pelexus

Date produced: 1936

Filmmaker(s):

Mel Wesleder

Harry French

Description:

"Mel Weslander and Harry French of San Francisco, with 'Solar Pelexus,' were winners of Agfa's contribution of six rolls of film. As the misspelling of the title indicates, the subject was a farce portraying the journey of two men to another planet in a rocket." American Cinematographer, Jan. 1938, 28.


Home Movies

Date produced: 1941

Filmmaker(s):

Fred Evans

Description:

" 'Oh, would some power the giftie gie us, to see ourselves as others see us.' In a sophisticated, fast moving satire, Fred Evans has struck at some of the blights of amateur movie making and screening. Turning his opening guns on tyros who ignore the instruction book which accompanies a new camera, Mr. Evans proceeds in a light, witty manner to poke cine fun at those movie makers who insist on learning the hard way. The picture continues on its farcical path, pausing now to watch invitations being telephoned for a screening of an as yet on-existent film and again to sympathize at the scene of frantic last minute editing. Home Movies has as its climax, of course, the fiasco of the screening, which should not be "tipped off" by a verbal preview. Compact and restrained, this movie offers meaningful as well as light entertainment." Movie Makers, Dec. 1946, 471.


Doghouse Blues

Date produced: 1946

Filmmaker(s):

E. H. Sparks

Description:

"In spite of the almost insurmountable difficulties in using feet to portray much of the action and most of the emotion in a movie, E. H. Sparks has managed to make Doghouse Blues completely comprehensible. A delightful farce of a bibulous fisherman, the story makes judicious use of the angler's big toe to denote thirst, hunger and any other emotion which might master a man on a solo weekend. Colorful scenes of inlets and bays, as well as attractive sequences of fishing craft, imbue the film with a flavor of authenticity. In satiric repetition, his indignant wife trails the tippling angler to the secluded spot where his boat rides at anchor, there to find him "taking the long count." A rude awakening for the errant husband and an eminently suitable final scene close the picture." Movie Makers, Dec. 1946, 471.


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