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Highwayman, The

Date produced: 1938

Description:

An amateur club adaptation of Alfred Noyes poem The Highwayman. A "ballad of love and murder" that "emphasizes atmosphere and explores the sympathetic relationship between natural and dramatic elements". The poem "narrates the highwayman's secret meeting with his love Bess, a landlord's daughter, their discovery by a group of soldiers who hold Bess as bait for the highwayman, and her grisly death by musket...Throughout the poem the natural settings play an important role in amplifying its supernatural and dramatic content...Like its use of natural settings, a natural acting style was employed to set this film adaptation apart from its source materials and its rival media. Finally, the film's use of double exposure in order to create the impression of ghostliness in the tragic couple's final reunion marks a particularly cinematic solution to the problem of visual representation" Tepperman, 244-245.


Vigeland of Life

Date produced: 1965

Filmmaker(s):

Robert Citron

Description:

"Vigeland on Life is a poetic study of the work of Gustav Vigeland, famous Norwegian sculptor. The narrator reads passages from the poetry of Kahlil Bigran, selecting excerpts from "The Prophet" while on the screen the camera gives us several dozen glimpses of Vigeland's statuary" PSA Journal, Sept. 1965, 50.


Hiding

Date produced: 1959

Filmmaker(s):

Timothy M. Lawler

Delores Lawer

Description:

"This time the Lawlers have produced a short-family picture in several parts. Each part is filmed to the interpretation of a poem recited by a very young voice, undoubtedly a member of the Lawler clan. The stories include the Shoemaker, the Bath, the Party, the Counterpane, snow (sleigh riding) and Hiding. A pleasing picture of the children accompanied by the voice of the little girl" PSA Journal, Nov. 1959, 48.


Trilogy

Date produced: 1949

Filmmaker(s):

Timothy M. Lawler

Description:

"In Trilogy, Timothy M. Lawler, jr., submits an interesting and, for the most part, successful effort to match romantic verse with appropriately emotional scenes. For his verse, Mr. Lawler has used Kilmer's Trees, Malay's The Wide World and Shelley's Love's Philosophy. The moods of the movie footage are excellent. The verse suffers a little, however, because it is released on the screen (or in narrative readings) a couplet at a time, at varying intervals, thus breaking into the overall rhythm. On the whole, however, Trilogy is a good approach to an attractive and difficult ideal." Movie Makers, Dec. 1949, 471.


Raggedy Man, The

Date produced: 1949

Filmmaker(s):

Andy Potter

Description:

"In this dramatization of James Whitcomb Riley's well known poem for children, Andy Potter chose a perfect character for the leading role. It is his fine acting that bolsters the spirit of the story and outweighs the uneven exposure of a few early scenes. Imaginative camera viewpoints and an interesting musical score give pace to what might have been a tritely sentimental production. Suspense is maintained where it is needed, and the settings, both indoors and out, have been chosen with an eye for variety. Quotes from the poet's verses serve as titles. The. Raggedy Man is a sensitive portrayal of childhood pathos and drama." Movie Makers, Dec. 1949, 455.


Red Cloud Rides Again

Date produced: 1934

Filmmaker(s):

F.R. Loscher

Description:

'Red Clouds Rides Again,' the 8mm picture by Dr. Loscher which was given first prize, was based on a poem that dealt with the pioneers crossing the desert. Its main action had to do with a wagon train being attacked by Indians. The manner in which Dr. Loscher handled this sequence would have done credit to a studio production. With only one wagon, three horses and six people at his command, he made it look like a production employing more in the way of properties and talent. His angles, his composition and his cutting are things for every amateur to observe. His story could have easily become hackneyed by poor cutting and editing, but he kept it moving at a fine tempo". American Cinematographer, Jan. 1936, 24.


Brook, The

Date produced: 1933

Filmmaker(s):

James A. Sherlock

Description:

"It was based on Tennyson's poem and the scenes were made to fit the poem. This was very evident from the smoothness of the continuity. His photography secured a very high marking." American Cinematographer, Dec. 1934, 376.


Dream of Eugene Aram, The

Date produced: 1927

Filmmaker(s):

Kennin Hamilton

Description:

"The special award, also of $500, went to Kennin Hamilton, of 28 Maitland Street, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, for his visualization of Hood's 'The Dream of Eugene Aram' in 16 millimeters. Mr. Hamilton played the principal role of Eugene Aram, disclosing a graceful pantomimic skill. The photography was handled by K. A. Mackenzie. A Cine Kodak, using Kodak Safety Film, was used. Mr. Hamilton had no special lenses or equipment and yet he achieved some singularly beautiful shots. Nature supplied his lighting, even for his interiors. A stepplader served as a tripod." Photoplay, Jun. 1928, 136.


Albert and the Lion

Date produced: 1940

Filmmaker(s):

A. Scott Moorhouse

Description:

"Devotees of the hilarious poem about the Lancashire couple and their son Albert would not fail to delight in Albert and the Lion, filmed by A. Scott Moorhouse. It portrays the misadventures of young Albert and his parents on their holiday at Blackpool, an English seaside resort. The story of how the objectionable young Albert, who carried a stick with a " 'orse's 'ead 'andle,'' was eaten by the lion is told in a highly satisfying manner. The scenes of the outlandishly costumed trio and their tribulations are timed to accompany a recitation of the poem. The characters are perfectly chosen and also outfitted to perfection. Although filmed at a Toronto zoo, the movie might well have been taken at the famous English resort of the poem. Mr. Moorhouse's handling of the players was masterly, and he made the best of his filming opportunities." Movie Makers, Dec. 1940, 601.


Trees—A Picture Poem

Date produced: 1938

Filmmaker(s):

Ripley W. Bugbee

Description:

"In Trees, whose subtitle describes it as a picture poem, we find what is generally admitted to be the masterpiece of that superb artist of the cinema, the late Ripley W. Bugbee, whose work so delighted his fellow members of the Amateur Cinema League and whose untimely death took from amateur cinematography one of its finest workers. This film is the realization of what Movie Makers has often counseled — setting film to music, instead of the course usually followed in theatrical pictures of setting music to film. The footage is planned to gear in with the musical setting of Joyce Kilmer's popular verse, but, since that setting is brief, other music, excellently chosen, is added to the scoring. The music of the poem is played once orchestrally, then other selections are offered, and the presentation concludes with a baritone voice singing the musical setting through completely. In this last part of the film, there is admirable synchronism, the scenes illustrating the words very accurately. Within the framework of this mechanism, Mr. Bugbee placed some of the loveliest 16mm. Kodachrome footage that has ever been accomplished. The motion is all that of nature, no persons appearing, but that motion has tempo and rhythm, as well as amazing beauty. There are trees in all kinds of movement, and to them are added scenes of clouds, moving water, grasses, flowers and birds. Without the record accompaniment, one would find, in Trees, Kodachrome footage of the highest order; with the musical addition, there is something that, within its limited scope, has never been bettered." Movie Makers, Dec. 1938, 597, 617.