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[Tropical Valley expedition]

Date produced: 1931

Filmmaker(s):

Mary Gibson Henry

Stan Clark

Description:

"Shows an expedition through northeastern British Columbia by Mary Gibson Henry, Pennsylvania botanist and plantswoman. Mrs. Henry was interested in the legendary "Tropical Valley" of northern B.C., where the warmth of hot springs supposedly fostered vegetation not otherwise found in the region. The film was shot in the summer of 1931, during the first of four such journeys she made in the period 1931-1935. Mrs. Henry was accompanied by her husband, Dr. J. Norman Henry; four of her children; topographer Knox McCusker (of the Dominion Topographical Surveys Branch); Dr. B.H. Chandler, a surgeon friend; and outfitter S. Clark, as well as various wranglers. The second and third reels of this three-reel film show the party of 16 travelling by pack-train, crossing rivers, caching food, and fishing, as well as some camp scenes. At an encampment of "Grand Lake Indians" on the Tetsa River, they engage Charlie Macdonald, the chief's son, to guide them to Toad Hot Springs on the Toad River, but they do not proceed north to Liard Hot Springs. On the return trip south, stops include St. Paul's Lake, Henry River, and Lake Mary and Lake Josephine [named after the Henry's daughters]; these place names do not seem to have become official. Following the Peace River, they arrive at Hudson's Hope (having travelled 800 miles in 79 days), and continue down river to Taylor Flats." (BC Archives)

The title given above is a supplied title based on the film contents. The actual title of the film is unknown, since it survives as reels 2 and 3 of 3 -- and the actual title and credits (if any) would likely have been at the start of reel 1.


Long May We Cherish

Date produced:

Filmmaker(s):

Tommy Walker

Description:

This film was produced at some time in the 1950s.


Spatsizi Wilderness

Date produced:

Filmmaker(s):

Tommy Walker

Description:

"The unique wilderness of the Spatsizi Plateau, and the area's flora, fauna and scenery, as observed by guide-outfitter Tommy Walker. The film points out the negative impact of recent development in the area, and emphasizes the importance of preserving the Spatsizi. Mountain sheep, Stone sheep, Osborn caribou, moose, eagles, beaver, marmots, and many other wildlife species are shown" British Columbia Archives.
This film was produced at some time between 1956 and 1970.


Grandfather’s Garden

Date produced: 1937

Filmmaker(s):

Russell C. Holslag


There Was a Tramp

Date produced: 1967

Description:

"There Was a Tramp has, at first fade-in, a similarity to other tramp pictures, but the life breathed into the main character is what brings this film out of the ordinary and sets it apart from the rest. The story line becomes almost secondary to the acting of the tramp and his portrayal" PSA Journal, Aug. 1967, 36.


Pattern of Living, The

Date produced: 1965

Filmmaker(s):

Ivan C. Lowe

Description:

"In Pattern of Living we are told how life on this earth probably began. Most likely it started after the upheaval of the sun 5,000 million years ago. Algae and animacules were perhaps the first forms of life, to be followed by the vegetable, and later the worm which was the forerunner of insects as we know them today. Clorophyll, the narrator explains, is responsible for combining water with sunlight to produce sugar that gives energy. Much of the film was shot through a microscope and some animation is used" PSA Journal, Sept. 1965, 51.


How Pine Trees Reproduce

Date produced: 1964

Filmmaker(s):

William M. Harlow

Description:

"How Pine Trees Reproduce has some exciting scenes and some little known information on a subject few of us know much about. It could be a dull film, but Dr. Harlow's skill with camera and scissors has produced a most informative result" PSA Journal, Sept. 1964, 51.


Flower for Isabelle, A

Date produced: 1963

Filmmaker(s):

Jerrold A. Peil

Description:

"Isabelle's next door neighbors - three bachelors - are asked to carry on for her, when she is stricken and hospitalized, in entering her prize orchid in the Garden Show. Their well-meaning but bumbling attempt to help her win the prize results in hilarious antics and a heart-warming conclusion to this delightful comedy" PSA Journal, Oct. 1963, 41.


Sugar Maple, The

Date produced: 1962

Filmmaker(s):

Helen Webb-Smith

Description:

"As the snow begins to melt, the sugar maple begins to raise some of the water thru its roots. The rising water picks up a small amount of sugar to feed the tree in its new growth. We have learned how to rob the tree of some of this sweet water which we call sap. We boil off the excess water, leaving a syrup-maple syrup. The picture presents the story of gathering the sap and the reduction to syrup. A sweet subject and nicely handled" PSA Journal, Oct. 1962, 36.


Daisy Dally

Date produced: 1961

Filmmaker(s):

Louise Luther

Description:

"Miss Luther has brought forth a delightful yet simple episode involving a little girl, a little boy, and a bouquet of daisies in the hand of each. We watch them as they walk across the meadow, play in the streams, give attention to the small animals and their attention to each other. Grandmother is ready with the kind of reward little children expect" PSA Journal, Oct. 1961, 47.


Total Pages: 3