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Seaside Holiday

Date produced: 1934

Filmmaker(s):

F. Radford Crawley

Description:

"A travelogue extolling the virtues of New England as a vacation spot. The film shows people swimming at York Beach; visiting a lighthouse; going deep-sea fishing on the "Pearl" with Captain Brewer and visiting Bald Head Cliff for clams, and Cape Neddick for a close-up look at marine life. The tourists appearing in the film may be the Crawley family. York Beach is located in Maine" Library and Archives Canada.


Sea Mark

Date produced: 1957

Filmmaker(s):

Joan Thurber Baldwin

Description:

Travelogue and social gathering document. Narrated by Joan Baldwin with orchestral music by Sibelius throughout. "Only 50 people lived here last winter and 12 children attend the school. Fishing..." oldfilm.org


Celle Qui Fait la Peinture

Date produced: 1963

Filmmaker(s):

James L. Watson

Description:

""That Which Makes the Picture" introduces its audience to the art of painting. Using a charming New England harbor scene, the viewer is shown the beginning sketches, the application of the basic colors, and the finishing touches to completion. After viewing the film, one has a greater appreciation for the care and attention to detail required of the artist working in oil paints" PSA Journal, Oct. 1963, 41.


Visited, The

Date produced: 1963

Filmmaker(s):

John Riley

Description:

"It is a late fall day, blustery and bleak, just before the first snow. The visit by the Angel of Death is heralded by the blowing leaves and the lonesome cry of the starlings. Dramatic camera work and original music scoring create the suspense and drama of this story in a setting of an old New England state in the early 1900s. This highly imaginative film by John Riley was awarded the MPD Student film Award" PSA Journal, Oct. 1963, 41.


Woods and Waters of Winterland

Date produced: 1952

Filmmaker(s):

Herman E. Dow

Description:

"With a sensitive feeling for nature's changing patterns, even in her least productive season, Herman E. Dow has captured the flavor and beauty of New England's quiet countryside in Woods and Waters of Winterland. Closeups of streams trickling through icebound banks and selective compositions of snow-laden boughs and bleak branches contribute to the overall theme of a pleasant scenic study. A musical accompaniment for the film is well chosen and recorded." Movie Makers, Dec. 1952, 341.


Backyard Birding

Date produced: 1952

Filmmaker(s):

Herbert D. Shumway

Description:

"Trim, tightly knit and altogether engaging, Backyard Birding presents, with affectionate attention to detail, a nature-loving father and his small son searching out the common and uncommon birds of their New England neighborhood. The film's pleasant music and informed but unassuming narrative are in sympathetic harmony with the pictorial whole. In it, with apparent purpose, Herbert D. Shumway has employed a cloudy-bright lighting throughout. Thus, the countless closeups of his bird neighbors, as they build their nests and rear their young, are in soft, true and unshadowed color — as so befits the film's gentle theme. And, just in case you're wondering, these superb scenes (on 8mm. film, remember) are beautifully sharp, despite the wider lens apertures which must have been used." Movie Makers, Dec. 1952, 324, 337.


New England Frames

Date produced: 1950

Filmmaker(s):

Lester F. Shaal

Description:

"Lester F. Shaal demonstrates, in New England Frames, what editing of existing footage can achieve. He has compiled from scenes of numerous sections of the Northeast a record of the year's seasons. Although the opening sequence of a train departing in a snowstorm seems to presage a more dramatic theme than that which follows, Mr. Shaal has captured the flavor of the New England countryside in all its seasonal beauty. Particularly competent in the winter sequence are the smooth follow shots of skiers. A little streamlining in the overall coverage would not have impaired the attractions of even this land of the early settlers." Movie Makers, Dec. 1950, 468.


Sea, The

Date produced: 1928

Filmmaker(s):

Hiram Percy Maxim

Description:

"Third prize in the non-dramatic division was given to Hiram Percy Maxim, of 276 North Whitley Street, Hartford, Conn., for his beautiful scenic, "The Sea." Mr. Maxim submitted four 16 millimeter films in the contest and another of these, "Summer," was awarded an honorable mention. Mr. Maxim is the pioneer president of the Amateur Cinema League and a national leader in amateur cinematography." Photoplay, Nov. 1929, 86


New England Autumn

Date produced: 1947

Filmmaker(s):

Hamilton H. Jones

Description:

"Hamilton H. Jones has again shown his marvelous ability to combine beautiful movies and fine music on the double turntable into a cinematic whole that, in New England Autumn, carries an audience through the calm delight of fall days to a climax that has great dignity and spiritual stimulation. We see autumn in its most restful and wistful mood, and the action is slowly paced in harmony with the dying year. There is leisurely strolling in the many hued woods. The leaves on the ground are scuffed through and gently scattered. We see the things that we all like to do in the forests in autumn. Finally, in an arresting sequence of autumn fruits — great, gleaming pumpkins and ruddy apples — the music turns to the inspiriting old Dutch hymn of thanksgiving. Rising first orchestrally and then voiced by a thousand singers, the chorus ends as our eyes are lifted to the simple spire of a New England church. Here is suavity, here is intelligent movie making and here are dignity and spiritual uplift." Movie Makers, Dec. 1947, 534.


Windjammer

Date produced: 1945

Filmmaker(s):

Sidney Moritz

Description:

"Sidney Moritz likes to record the few vestiges that remain in this rapidly changing country of the days that were. After earlier voyages on an Ohio River "sternwheeler," he made two cruises on the Mattie, an old schooner that now hugs the New England coast and carries vacationers. In Windjammer there is cinematic beauty, with delightful scenes of masts and sails. There is also a detailed and very human record of the way in which the holiday makers — who also help with the ship's chores — enjoy a recreation both salty and salubrious. One is sure that they and the ship's crew — including grim old Captain Grant — had a grand time. Mr. Moritz must have had one, also, if his gay footage reflects his mood." Movie Makers, Dec. 1945, 497.


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