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104, The

Date produced: 1965

Filmmaker(s):

Oscar H. Horovitz

Description:

"The 104 is a serious, factual recount of the landing of the Pilgrims at Plymouth, Mass., early in the 17th Century in terms of what one sees and finds in the vicinity of Plymouth Rock today. The rock itself is the legendary start of it all, followed by glimpses of wax figures that have been created to resemble some of the monuments and other scenes in the area" PSA Journal, Sept. 1965, 51.


Black Cat, The

Date produced: 1965

Filmmaker(s):

A. L. Binekorb

Description:

"The Black Cat is a 25-minute version of Edgar Allen Poe's story by the same name and concerns a man who does away with his wife in what he believes to be the perfect crime, only to be outdone in the end by the family black cat. This low key, well dramatized version is the only 8mm film among the top ten and also received the MPD Scenario Film Award" PSA Journal, Sept. 1965, 50.


Massachusetts Revisited

Date produced: 1961

Filmmaker(s):

Edward M. Crane

Description:

"Dr. Crane has a humorous approach for a visit to Boston, Lexington, Concord, Bunker Hill, Plymouth Rock, and the Mayflower II. Each sequence is preceded by a title quotation from a famous writer, to wit: "Boston.....the hub of the solar system" by Holmes; "The fate of the nation was riding that night" by Longfellow; and ends with "the unconquerable rectitude" of the Plymouth Maiden and Edward Crane" PSA Journal, Oct. 1961, 48-49.


Breath of Spring, A

Date produced: 1951

Filmmaker(s):

Donald W. Volkman

Description:

"Donald Volkman's film. A Breath of Spring, is a montage study of the vernal season in a city — in this case, Boston. But shots of the blowing skirt of a girl, the wind-whipped awning of a department store and the clothesline ballet of the Monday wash are universal. Mr. Volkman has truly brought imagination to his pictorial progression of spring, from melting snows in a churchyard to the full flowering of the sun-warmed earth and its people. His choice of musical accompaniment is especially notable, particularly with shots of running water in gutters and the Boston Pop's rendition of The Wearing of the Green with the sequence of a St. Patrick's Day parade. A Breath of Spring was created as a thesis in a course on motion pictures at Boston University, where Mr. Volkman is a student." Movie Makers, Dec. 1951, 411.


Romance of Gloucester

Date produced: 1951

Filmmaker(s):

Bert Seckendorf

Description:

"Bert Seckendorf is at his best documenting interesting places and events of this land of ours, and in editing and titling such films to impart sustaining interest on the screen. In 'Romance of Gloucester' he has focused his camera on both the interesting places and much of the contemporary life of Gloucester. His discerning lens brings satisfying multi-scene sequences of activities of Gloucester natives, instead of the one-shot treatment so often accorded such material by the uninitiated cine filmer. Result is, one experiences something in viewing this picture on the screen. Seckendorf's photography is clear-cut, discerning, and shows good taste in composition." American Cinematographer, May. 1952, 222.


Menemsha

Date produced: 1949

Filmmaker(s):

Jose M. Pavon

Description:

" Unity of theme is the striking characteristic of Jose M. Pavon's Menemsha — and its Achilles heel as well. The producer, in a series of beautifully composed scenes that seem to ebb and flow with the surging rhythm of the sea, has extracted the essence of a small fishing town on the coast of Martha's Vineyard. For almost its entire length, the film emphasizes the salt and the sea and the strange, lovely things of the ocean littoral with a feeling that Mr. Pavon accents brilliantly in double exposures of the shimmering sea water sweeping over even the deserted wharves. Unfortunately, Menemshas unity breaks down a little as Mr. Pavon's camera roams too far afield and brings in elements that suggest fresh water and inland life rather than his original theme. A little cutting would tighten up a film that, technically and artistically, is a delicate and creative delight." Movie Makers, Dec. 1949, 454.


Nantucket, A Chapter from Early America

Date produced: 1943

Filmmaker(s):

Russell T. Pansie

Description:

"In filming Nantucket, A Chapter from Early America, Russell T. Pansie chose a happy subject for Kodachrome — the weatherbeaten grays and pastel colors of the ancient buildings of Nantucket. Most color films are made with an effort to present colors as brilliantly as possible, but this picture is a delightful exception, and it is a notable example of the versatility of color film in the hands of a competent cameraman. In Nantucket, A Chapter from Early America, we see the orderly streets of the island, the historic buildings that date from the early Eighteenth Century, the mansions built by the prosperous sea captains of the Nineteenth Century and we glimpse the island's natural charm. But, in the brief footage that he wisely allowed himself, the cameraman has achieved more than an architectural study; he has reproduced the atmosphere of life as it was lived in the past." Movie Makers, Dec. 1943, 474.