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War of the Ants

Date produced: 1966

Filmmaker(s):

H. Braig

Description:

"War of the Ants is a deft piece of animation against elaborate stage settings and masterful props. No scale tells us how big the ants are, but their movements and actions are superb. The story has a similarity to human warfare in its satirical approach" PSA Journal, Aug. 1967, 36.


Life Cycle of the Monarch

Date produced: 1966

Filmmaker(s):

Kenneth Middleham


Language of the Bee

Date produced: 1966

Description:

"Dr. Karl von Frisch performs some of the experiments which led to his discovery of the language of the bees. Explains the system by which bees communicate information about direction and distance. Emphasizes the importance of curiosity in scientific research." via WorldCat


Narraburra

Date produced: 1966

Filmmaker(s):

Don Featherstone

Description:

"Narraburra is a slick piece of drama telling of the misfortune encountered by a prospector in the wilds of Australia who is thrown from his horse and breaks his leg. While his friends go for aid, a colony of meat ants find him and he knows that in a short while they will eat his flesh until he dies. How he keeps the ants from achieving their objective provides good cinema fare" PSA Journal, Sept. 1966, 35.


Monarch Butterfly, The

Date produced: 1966

Filmmaker(s):

Margaret McLeod

Description:

"The Monarch Butterfly, winner of the MPD Nature Film Trophy, depicts the life cycle of this well known butterfly and shows the various stages through which it must pass" PSA Journal, Sept. 1966, 35.


Pattern of Living, The

Date produced: 1965

Filmmaker(s):

Ivan C. Lowe

Description:

"In Pattern of Living we are told how life on this earth probably began. Most likely it started after the upheaval of the sun 5,000 million years ago. Algae and animacules were perhaps the first forms of life, to be followed by the vegetable, and later the worm which was the forerunner of insects as we know them today. Clorophyll, the narrator explains, is responsible for combining water with sunlight to produce sugar that gives energy. Much of the film was shot through a microscope and some animation is used" PSA Journal, Sept. 1965, 51.


Butterfly with Four Birthdays, The

Date produced: 1965

Filmmaker(s):

Sidney N. Laverents

Description:

"The Butterfly with Four Birthdays is a well done documentary on the life cycle of the Anise Swallowtail (Papilio Zelicaon). The Zelicaon, often mistaken for the Monarch, lives in the Western United States and lays her eggs on the anise plant, also known as sweet fennel. From the egg comes the baby caterpillar, thirdly the pupa or chrysalis stage, and finally, on its fourth birthday, the butterfly. This film also received the MPD Nature Film Award" PSA Journal, Sept. 1965, 50.


Mystery of the Monarchs

Date produced: 1960

Filmmaker(s):

Lee Ruffner

Harry Ruffner

Description:

"The monarch butterfly comes home to the butterfly trees at Pacific Grove, California, from Canada and the Pacific Northwest, in the early fall. School children, with the help of the grownups, stage a colorful parade in honor of these monarchs. The habits and complete life cyce unfold before us; the butterfly, eggs, larva or caterpillar, chrysalis, and the emergence of the new butterfly. A fascinating subject presented beautifully" PSA Journal, Nov. 1960, 40.


Wanderer Butterfly, The

Date produced: 1955

Filmmaker(s):

William G. Nicholls

Description:

"A study of the Wanderer Butterfly presented in an interesting manner. Making full use of extension tubes and telelenses, the excellent extreme close-up photography affords the audience a detailed glimpse of the life cycle of this beautiful insect." PSA Journal, Dec. 1955, 36.


Nature in the Garden

Date produced: 1953

Filmmaker(s):

William G. Nicholls

Description:

"In this year's goodly collection of films based largely on extension tube cinematography, Nature in the Garden by W. G. Nicholls tops not only the excellent pictures of many other contestants, but also his own Ladybird, a ten best award winner in 1953. Nature in the Garden is an instructional film pure and simple, chock full of facts to please the most apathetic, as well as the most enthusiastic, bug-viewer. Excellent technical work by a master student of both nature and cinematography has resulted in outstanding and often exciting closeups of bees, spiders, moths and other insects. Skillful editing and an unobtrusive yet informative narrative make Mr. Nicholls' production an exceptional short subject. To this teacher, Nature in the Garden is definitely superior to most of the professional nature films now being circulated in American educational circles" PSA Journal, Jan. 1955, 49.


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