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Other Hawaii, The

Date produced: 1969

Filmmaker(s):

John Savage


Linda’s Dream, or Korn Tiki

Date produced: 1956

Filmmaker(s):

J. Edward Macdonald

Description:

"A well done travelogue of Hawaii showing the sports the tourist usually sees, the profusion of flowers, etc." PSA Journal, Nov. 1956, 45.


Invitation to Hawaii

Date produced: 1951

Filmmaker(s):

Harold Lincoln Thompson

Description:

"This picture, we predict, will be both widely acclaimed and widely criticized for, in each case, that quality which people call "professional." If this prediction proves true, then the producer's purpose in making Invitation to Hawaii will have been conclusively achieved. For of the film Harold L. Thompson has written us at ACL as follows: "I made the picture largely as an experiment to see whether an amateur with sufficient enthusiasm could produce a 16mm. documentary which approached professional standards." The impression here is that on the case book of this experiment Dr. Thompson may now write: "Q.E.D." For Invitation to Hawaii has in every foot of it the polish and pace which one associates with professional standards. It was clearly planned, ably photographed and concisely edited. All in all. a brilliant piece of work." Movie Makers, Dec. 1951, 410.


Paradise Honolulu

Date produced: 1950

Filmmaker(s):

Nobuo Myiaoka

Description:

"Paradise Honolulu: Nobuo Miyaoka, using a Cine Special camera and Kodachrome film, has documented contemporary life in Honolulu as have perhaps few cine cameraists in recent years. The picture is essentially newsreel in style and depends upon titles to convey that which is not clear in the pictorial action. But interest is sustained in the careful selection of subject matter and the manner in which it has been photographed. A highlight is the fine night photography in color of Honolulu's annual lantern parade." American Cinematographer, May. 1951, 190.


South of Honolulu

Date produced: 1941

Filmmaker(s):

Dan Billman

Description:

"Dan Billman, jr., has told you in the September number of this magazine how he came to make South of Honolulu. What he could not possibly put into words is the outright and amazing entertainment value of this elaborate record. Hawaii, for the Billmans, meant far more than the Aloha Tower, Diamond Head and the Kodachrome set piece of weekly hula dancing. In their place this adventurous couple found — some 200 miles south of Honolulu — the calm beauty of native life, the exciting patterns of native fishing and feasting and the exotic loveliness of tropical blooms against their true backgrounds. For them, no filming task seemed impossible. Their achievements range from an amusing sequence of the "'sea going" cowboys of the Hawaiian coast, to a striking and incredible study of religious ceremonies within a Buddhist temple. Mr. Billman's beautifully filmed production, accompanied throughout with sound and music personally recorded in the Islands, has the full bodied stature of mature screen entertainment." Movie Makers, Dec. 1941, 564.