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Walk with Me Beneath a Tree

Date produced: 1965

Filmmaker(s):

Warren Thompson

Description:

"A journey from bustling Chicago to the fall foliage and winter landscape of rural Wisconsin." Chicago Film Archives.


Autumn Around Fuji

Date produced: 1938

Filmmaker(s):

Khoji Tsukamoto


Trailer In The Pines

Date produced: 1959

Filmmaker(s):

Alton Morton

Thelma Morton

Description:

"In the fall of the year, the late flowers are blooming, the evergreens have about completed their year's growth in preparation for the heavy winter, the deciduous have donned their golden mantles soon to become their winter blanket. All part of the thanksgiving for a bountiful season. The tall golden hillside trees set in a great panorama, interspersed with the dark grenes, the paths carpeted with golden leaves of varying hues of yellow, orange and red. It is here we visit the Mortons with their trailer in the pines" PSA Journal, Nov. 1959, 49.


Little Girl

Date produced: 1955

Filmmaker(s):

Glen H. Turner

Description:

"Glen Turner might take a cue from "Gigi" and "Thank Heaven for little girls" with curly hair and their interesting mud pies. With teddy bear and dog, she does for a walk. En route we view the ducks, geese and other farm animals. The trees display their fall wardrobe to add to the delight of a walk in the woods. Soon the dog realizes they have gone too far from home and he goes back for Mother. Soon we return to the little girl asleep admidst the golden leaves. An enjoyable picture of things little girls like to do" PSA Journal, Nov. 1958, 46-47.


Ah! Wilderness

Date produced: 1950

Filmmaker(s):

Charles H. Benjamin

Description:

"Ah! Wilderness: The stark beauty of remote mountain and plain areas, as yet untouched by the unrelenting surge of modern civilization, has been caught by Charles Benjamin's camera and Kodachrome film. Adapted from the book Stone Dust, by Frank Ernest Hill, Benjamin's film opens with scenes of mountain peaks and passes in winter- peaks mantled in snow, and trickling brooks that somehow have evaded the wintry grip of Jack Frost. The picture progresses in a like manner through Spring, Summer and Autumn, rendering a pictorial account of the ever-changing seasons in one of the few remaining wilderness areas of America. The picture discloses skillful camera handling as well as a talent for building interesting continuity through artful editing and titling." American Cinematographer, May 1951, 189


Indian Summer

Date produced: 1947

Filmmaker(s):

Bert Seckendorf

Description:

"'Indian Summer,' properly may be termed a poem on film. Bert Seckendorf took his camera into the great outdoors one autumn day and photographed many beautiful autumnal scenes which he then skillfully knit together in a smooth flowing pictorial continuity. Scenes of colorful autumn foliage, falling leaves, blue Indian Summer skies, lazy rivulets carrying tiny sailboats of leaves toward the sea -all add up to an impressive ten minutes of screen entertainment. Seckendorf photographed this picture with a Cine Special and Kodachrome film." American Cinematographer, Apr. 1950, 146.


October Byways

Date produced: 1935

Filmmaker(s):

L. Clyde Anderson

Description:

"L. Clyde Anderson was given an award for Color photography, for 'October By-Ways.' We want to congratulate Mr. Anderson for his selection of colors. It is one of the very first amateur pictures we have seen where color was really properly balanced. There were no harsh notes to distract, but he chose scenes where the ensemble blended and where there was a fine eye-resting blance of color and also color composition. It was obvious that Anderson used haze filters on his outside scenes as the sky does not have that postcard-blue effect, but has been reduced to almost a gray haze which helps the fall colors in the trees and does not take the eye away from the main points of interest." American Cinematographer, Jan. 1937, 37.


Autumn

Date produced: 1948

Filmmaker(s):

Martin E. Drayson

Description:

"In Autumn, Martin E. Drayson extends brilliant camera handling to embrace a quality ordinarily associated with painting, raising his film several notches above the usual autumnal study. Call this quality expressionism, a term we are familiar with in the paintings of Manet, Cezanne, Gauguin or Vlaminck. Literally painting with light the shades and hues of the season, sheer poetry is produced by their reflections in the shimmering surface of a pond, which unique camera viewpoint was used for the climax of the footage. The film escapes the static quality often noted in nature studies by the dexterous changing of camera position; added to this are the natural movements created by the wind brushing softly through the dry leaves, or, again, by gentle ripples momentarily disturbing the water's glassy surface." Movie Makers, Dec. 1948, 475.


New England Autumn

Date produced: 1947

Filmmaker(s):

Hamilton H. Jones

Description:

"Hamilton H. Jones has again shown his marvelous ability to combine beautiful movies and fine music on the double turntable into a cinematic whole that, in New England Autumn, carries an audience through the calm delight of fall days to a climax that has great dignity and spiritual stimulation. We see autumn in its most restful and wistful mood, and the action is slowly paced in harmony with the dying year. There is leisurely strolling in the many hued woods. The leaves on the ground are scuffed through and gently scattered. We see the things that we all like to do in the forests in autumn. Finally, in an arresting sequence of autumn fruits — great, gleaming pumpkins and ruddy apples — the music turns to the inspiriting old Dutch hymn of thanksgiving. Rising first orchestrally and then voiced by a thousand singers, the chorus ends as our eyes are lifted to the simple spire of a New England church. Here is suavity, here is intelligent movie making and here are dignity and spiritual uplift." Movie Makers, Dec. 1947, 534.


Autumn Glory

Date produced: 1946

Filmmaker(s):

John R. Kibar

Evelyn Kibar

Description:

"John R. Kibar has taken the subject of recording the hues of a fall countryside and has lifted it above the familiar medley of garish color. With an interesting variety of viewpoints and an artist's eye for compositions, he has achieved the flowing, rhythmic mood of nature in her most popular season for color filmers. Particularly in shots of trees reflected in streams and the sprightly dancing of golden leaves in the wind has Mr. Kibar surpassed the usual run of nature studies. Autumn Glory is replete with movement, but closeups of a colorful branch of berries or stocks of thistle against the sky serve as punctuation for the longer sequences. A human touch is added by including an artist in occasional shots, as he sketches the scenes shown in the major part of the film." Movie Makers, Dec. 1946, 486.


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