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Ukiyoe

Date produced: 1968

Filmmaker(s):

John M. Lavery


Legend of San San Ku, The

Date produced: 1968

Description:

"The Legend of San San Ku was a practically unanimous choice as winner of the top award with its story of a Japanese legend. If the credits were to be removed from the beginning of this film, it would be hard to believe that it was not made in Japan. It was a very ambitious production for a crew of amateurs to undertake, and they came through with flying colors. Here's 20 minutes of Japan that is delightful to experience" PSA Journal, Oct. 1968, 48.


Rice and Farmer

Date produced: 1967

Filmmaker(s):

Masakazu Ueda

Description:

"Rice and Farmer depicts the life and toil of the Japanese who raise rice for a living. Ueda, who made the film, has a keen eye for composition. Few filmers today pause long enough to look for a pleasing view through the lens before pressing the trigger, but this is one of Ueda's strong points, and his film is a joy to see for this one aspect alone" PSA Journal, Aug. 1967, 37.


Isle of the Gods

Date produced: 1967

Filmmaker(s):

Veda Linford

James B. Linford

Description:

"Isle of the Gods is a visit to the Island of Bali and a closeup look at the people, their beliefs, their superstitions, and their way of life. Bali is changing. No longer is this a primitive isle, for the constant encroachment of civilization has made its mark here as well as elsewhere in the South Seas" PSA Journal, Aug. 1967, 37.


201-203

Date produced: 1967

Filmmaker(s):

Krishna Shah

Description:

"201-203 tells the simple story of man and woman, the alienated anti-heroes from two civilizations at the opposite ends of the spectrum, Asian and America. They try to make contact, through reality as well as fantasy, against a backdrop of technology and pop theology. Well acted and well photographed" PSA Journal, Aug. 1967, 36.


Siam

Date produced: 1964

Filmmaker(s):

Lindsay McLeod

Description:

"Siam is a better than average travelog about this oriental country. The narrator is careful to point out the odd and the unusual, while the camera depicts every day events in a subjective manner as well as catching some unusual scenes usually missed by the casual tourist" PSA Journal, Sept. 1964, 51.


On the Road to Mandalay

Date produced: 1964

Filmmaker(s):

C. Earle Memory

Description:

"On the Road to Mandalay takes us via word and picture to this far away spot where we see elephants performing heavy tasks, street scenes, a street parade, merchants hawking their wares, fabulous temples, artisans at work and native dancers. The photography is consistently good, and Memory has used close-ups liberally" PSA Journal, Sept. 1964, 50.


Orient–Old and New–Japan

Date produced: 1964

Filmmaker(s):

Charles J. Ross

Description:

"Orient–Old and New–Japan is an excellent travelog of this oriental island in the well known superb Ross style. Narrated by his wide, we are taken to many of the well known spots on the island, and shown some of the more unusual places of interest. The commentary is full of factual information which gives the film an exceptionally good pacing" PSA Journal, Sept. 1964, 50.


Origami

Date produced: 1963

Filmmaker(s):

Rose Dabbs

Stuart Dabbs

Description:

"Many forms of art originated in old Japan. Here is a demonstration of a unique and improbably one that began as entertainment for children. Origami, the art of paper folding, is charmingly portrayed and described in this very imaginative film. One of the Ten Best, it will be enjoyed in the 1963 Top of the Ten pack" PSA Journal, Oct. 1963, 40.


Hong Kong

Date produced: 1963

Filmmaker(s):

Veda Linford

James B. Linford

Description:

"The Hong Kong of today is still one of the most beautiful cities in the world, but under fer facade of sparkling beauty lies poverty, disease, and hunger. Crowded to the point of bursting, housing, sanitation and food cannot keep pace with the stream of humanity pouring into the city. Beautifully photographed, we see the people living their daily lives in make-shift shelters, on sampans, on top of buildings and on every square foot of available space. You can see the hunger and fear in their eyes, yet there is smiling acceptance, with hope for the future. The narrator's voice is full of compassion, yet recognizes the dignity of these work-worn, deprived people. Seeing the children, in their happy innocence and lack of concern for a desperate situation, "Hong Kong can break your heart!" PSA Journal, Oct. 1963, 40.


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