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Behind the Dial

Date produced: 1937

Filmmaker(s):

Robert C. Orr

Kenneth V. Bloomer

Description:

"To produce a clear explanation of just how the modern dial telephone works is a task that would tax any movie maker's ability, or even the united capabilities of any two filmers. Yet, when Kenneth Bloomer and Robert Orr. jr., pooled their movie making and telephone engineering knowledge to make Behind the Dial, they produced one of the most competent technical films that Movie Makers staff has ever seen. Clear, flawless photography, combined with a script that was worked out with infinite care, makes the story interesting and complete. Particularly effective are the sequences of the operation of the automatic machinery of the dial systems, in which shots of the encased mechanisms dissolve into scenes of the same mechanisms after the cases have been removed. The camera achieves the effect of an X-ray in revealing what actually happens within a maze of machinery to make the dial system possible. The film represents a tremendous amount of labor and planning, for much of the equipment shown had to be filmed at the telephone office late at night when the traffic was very light. This is a documentary film of both educational and entertainment value." Movie Makers, Dec. 1937, 628-629.


Beach Holiday

Date produced: 1937

Filmmaker(s):

Raymond O'Connell

Description:

"Beach Holiday, an 8mm. story in Kodachrome, deserves high praise because of its smooth and interesting treatment of material that is directly within the reach of every movie maker. Made by Raymond O'Connell, this subject is a fine example of natural continuity, done in a simple, straightforward manner. The interior shots, which show the family getting up in the morning, their planning and preparation for a day at the beach and, at the end of the film, their return home, afford excellent examples of good exposure and technical work on 8mm. interior scenes. Many of the transitions are well planned, notably a clever shot which shows the final packing of the picnic hamper at home. Its cover is raised in the kitchen, so that the hamper fills the entire frame. The cover is then lowered, revealing a beach scene in the background. The outdoor work gives an excellent exposition of a day at the beach, complete with swimming, sports and boardwalk amusements." Movie Makers, Dec. 1937, 628.


Richmond Under Three Flags

Date produced: 1937

Filmmaker(s):

Waldo E. Austin

Description:

"To love a place so well that you can film it so well that the result becomes commercially sought is not the happy fortune of every movie amateur. Waldo E. Austin's Richmond Under Three Flags was paid for by the Morris Plan Bank of Virginia, in Richmond, and is distributed by the Virginia Conservation Commission. Here, a man of culture and a filmer of exceptional care and refinement has given us his own home, lovingly and interestingly presented, with a happy quota of cinematic ornaments. The pace of this accomplishment is leisurely, as was the Old South, yet its manner is modern, as is the new Richmond. In the title wordings, Mr. Austin is especially fortunate, avoiding banality on the one hand and '"fine writing" on the other, with just enough rhetoric to give the flavor of one of the country's most rhetorical centers. The interior scenes of public buildings have been accomplished with an apparent effortlessness that conceals a great deal of effort. Here is the publicity film in its most suave expression." Movie Makers, Dec. 1937, 627-628.


Moulage For Masks

Date produced: 1937

Filmmaker(s):

James E. Bliss

Description:

"In Moulage For Masks, filmed for Dr. G. A. Peterson, Dr. James E. Bliss presents with satisfying clarity a step by step study of the procedure of producing the facial masks used to guide the operator in making dental restorations. A logical and carefully prepared script, added to finished camera work and exact editing, has created a color picture that gives an amazing amount of information in brief footage. It is a classroom film of notable competence, both because of the logicality of the cinematic thinking that it represents and because of the successful manner in which it always focuses audience attention on significant action. Carefully written titles integrate perfectly with the sequences, and the whole forms as compact a study as could be produced on this subject. At the same time, an eye for color composition and human interest has made the reel attractive from the layman's point of view." Movie Makers, Dec. 1937, 627.

"Good classroom film describing a method for the construction of facial casts by the use of a rubber like 'Moulage' for the impression. The photographic quality of the film is so good and the subject matter so interesting that the film is far above average. The color of course adds to its attractiveness. Film follows the instructor through the procedure of making a mask." Educational Film Catalog, 1939, 227.


In From the Sea

Date produced: 1937

Filmmaker(s):

Fenno Jacobs

Description:

"In From the Sea, produced by Fenno Jacobs for Todd Shipyards Corporation, establishes a precedent this year, for it is the first 16mm sound film, directly recorded in this medium, to be offered for Ten Best consideration in the Special Class. But the fact that this film carries its own directly recorded sound is only one of its many unusual qualities. It tells an interesting and dramatic story of the manifold activities that make up a working day in a great shipyard, where the monster ships are hauled from their native element without ceremony and attacked by a swarm of workers who specialize in every known form of ship repair. By handling this material with great technical facility and by fine editing tempo, excellent choice of camera viewpoint and a flair for cinematic effectiveness, Mr. Jacobs has succeeded in creating an industrial picture which has a high general interest. Among the many noteworthy sections of this film is the sequence which shows the workers' lunch hour. It is outstanding for its fine cutting and for the dramatic pause which creates a respite from the Titanic activities of the working hours. Interesting also is the sound accompaniment which is an integral part of the film and which, in addition to a spoken commentary and spot recording of shipyard sounds, includes well chosen excerpts from Stravinsky's suite, The Fire-Bird, to establish a modern mood." Movie Makers, Dec. 1937, 627.


Primitive Patzcuaro

Date produced: 1937

Filmmaker(s):

Ralph E. Gray

Description:

"One comes from a screening of Primitive Patzcuaro, by Ralph E. Gray, with an overwhelming impression of pure beauty. Here, in compositions which often echo the Old Masters in their warmth of color and satisfying balance, an amateur movie maker has turned his camera on the simple life about him and found it pleasing. One after another, the magnificent scenes and sequences bring from the spectator that involuntary expression of deep pleasure which is ambrosia even to the great of amateur movies. In Primitive Patzcuaro, Mr. Gray has portrayed, with leisure, the life of the Tarascan Indians, remote from civilization in a rarely visited section of Mexico. Although magnificent in its color studies, the film is abundant in human interest as well; in portions devoted to the bright native dances and religious ceremonies, it presents a series of tableaux that are breath taking in their effectiveness." Movie Makers, Dec. 1937, 626-627.


Mount Zao

Date produced: 1937

Filmmaker(s):

Khoji Tsukamoto

Description:

"A down mountain ski run, etched against a filtered sky and set in a world of fantastic snow shapes and incredible beauty, is the theme of Mount Zao, which was filmed on the Japanese mountain of that name. Khoji Tsukamoto has mastered the technique of back lighting the dramatic turns, stems and jumps of a down mountain run so that they are framed against luminous clouds of powdered snow. The ski runners are always preceded by an ubiquitous cameraman who has invariably chosen the most effective angle for each scene of his closely knit sequences. The result is as smooth a picture of skiing as the screen has seen. In sequencing, editing and the nuances of tempo, this film is near the top. And particularly praiseworthy is the way in which the cameraman has involved backgrounds of astonishing natural beauty with foregrounds of interest compelling action." Movie Makers, Dec. 1937, 603, 626.


Little Sherlock

Date produced: 1937

Filmmaker(s):

Charles J. Carbonaro

Description:

"Already well in the forefront of contemporary photoplay producers, Charles J. Carbonaro has taken a marked step onward in his current comedy, Little Sherlock. Simply planned yet smoothly integrated, this new production tells a delightful tale of the precocious daughter of a photographer, who was always "helping" father. How, during a surprise robbery of their home, she records the crux of the event with Daddy's amateur movie camera provides a denouement which is both satisfying and successful. In Little Sherlock, Mr. Carbonaro has more than maintained the suave lighting and impeccable technical standards for which his work is known; he now wins new honors with a display of genuine talent for light comedy direction. To both of these credits must be added praise for his own acting of the busy cameraman and for the portrayal of the eager apprentice by his own daughter, Alice." Movie Makers, Dec. 1937, 603.


Least of These, The

Date produced: 1937

Filmmaker(s):

Ripley W. Bugbee

Description:

"The Least of These handles a difficult subject in a way which promotes the cinematic medium to a high position as a sympathetic interpreter of the afflicted. Ripley W. Bugbee has presented a fine understanding of the problem of those whose minds are crippled and has given a clear cinematic exposition of the humane methods used in one institution to bring to these persons, young and old, a productive happiness. The film opens with a historical presentation of the problem of feeblemindedness, in a sequence which is smooth and effectively handled in costuming and direction as well as in photographic technique. Passing on to modern times, the work of a present day institution is shown in all its aspects. The handling of the color medium is exceedingly well done, particularly in those ordinarily difficult shots of interior activities. The closeup work, showing details of the manual operations involved in craftsmanship, is unusual in quality. Well chosen angle shots add variety to the film, which is expertly titled in the Kodachrome medium." Movie Makers, Dec. 1937, 603.


Complete Operative and Prosthetic Technic for Porcelain Jacket Crown Restorations

Date produced: 1937

Filmmaker(s):

Milton Cohen

Description:

"It is probably safe to say that nowhere in the world has been made a dental picture more perfect in detail than Complete Operative and Prosthetic Technic for Porcelain Jacket Crown Restorations. Dr. Milton Cohen has portrayed this highly intricate and skilled dental project in superb Kodachrome closeups. Not only do the ultra close shots of the work in the oral cavity achieve great fidelity as to color, but also the many operations in the dental laboratory are filmed with equal expertness. Certain steps in the procedure are portrayed by the use of heroic steed models, and these scenes were smoothly integrated with the scenes taken in the mouth of the living model. Although treating of a subject necessarily highly technical in nature, the titles were so well written that they made the film clear to a layman. The picture is distinguished by even exposure, sharp focus, good lighting and excellent camera angles. It is interesting to note that Dr. Cohen not only made the picture but also did all the work shown in it." Movie Makers, Dec. 1937, 603.


Total Pages: 209