E-mail us: amdb@ucalgary.ca

Identifier:

  • 94931 (Source: National Archives)

Date produced: 1940

Filmmaker(s):

Kenneth F. Space

Languages:

English

Length:

358 ft

Format:

16mm

Colour:

B&W

Sound Notes:

Silent

Awards/Recognition:

National Archives list of titled amateur films

Description:

"Portrait of Calhoun School, founded in 1892, and its vocational work among rural African Americans of Lowndes County, Alabama. The film shows the living conditions of the poor and illustrates how the school makes a difference in health education, agriculture, and road construction." The Field Guide to Sponsored Films.

Resources:

Produced by the Harmon Foundation, as part of their Negro Education for American Living series.

This film is a part of the Harmon Foundation Collection held by National Archives.

Some footage from the film is available through CriticalPast.

Locations:

  • Lowndes County, Alabama (Filming)

Relevant Locations

Subjects:

Genre:

Form:

Repository:

Harmon Foundation Collection, National Archives

Viewing Notes:

"On the Calhoun School, Lowndes County, Alabama, which is attended by Negro farm residents. Shows poorly managed farms and poverty conditions; children go to rural school. Portrait of Miss Charlotte R. Thorne, Caucasian foundress of Calhoun School; campus buildings; Dr. Jerome F. Kidder, Principal; classes include health instruction; campus life; students help to improve roads and local agricultural methods. Graduation ceremonies and dance. Mary McLeod Bethune, Director of Negro Affairs Division of Youth Administration, addresses graduates," via the National Archives.